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MRPC NEWS July 18th

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

On-Line Newsletter

July Club Meeting

Wednesday  July 19th at 7pm at Indoor Range

All are welcome to attend

 

 

Fullbore Rifle

The group will shoot at 600 yards

At the Camp White Range

Thru the White Steel Gate off Kershaw Rd

at

5 PM this Wednesday July 19 ,

22 rounds or less prone or bench.

For Information call:  Frank 541 899 6872

 

 

IDPA Match

Saturday July 22nd

8am  Come Early

More Information Available At :  http://www.idpa.com/

 

 

Multi-Gun Match

July 29 @ 7:30 am – 3:00 pm

Contact

MULTI-GUN DIRECTOR Tom Cail mrpcmultigun@gmail.com

For More Information

 

 

NRA 22 Rimfire Precision Pistol Shooting

“Bullseye”

Every Monday night

Set up at 7pm, Shooting Starts at 7:30pm

22 pistol, 90 Rounds of Ammo, Hearing and Sight Protection

All Members Welcome

Target Cost $1

 

 

“Shooting Sports USA” on-line magazine

http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nra/ssusa_201707/

 

 

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MRPC NEWS EXTRA

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

On-Line Newsletter Extra

 

MRPC    USPSA Match

“United States Pistol Shooting Association

 

This SUNDAY July 16th  9am

Sports Park Pistol Competition Ranges

Oregon Section Points Match

Please come help set-up on Saturday at 9am

 

 

 

Klamath Action Steel Match

There will be an action steel match this Saturday in Keno.

Registration is at 9:00 with shooting to start at 9:30

Please show up early to help with setup if you can….

 

Thanks                 Larry Watson    csicomp@gmail.com

 

 

 

MRPC Multi-Gun Match July 29th 2017

Shooters,

 

We are having the last local match of the year on July 29th. Please arrive at the range between 0700 and 0730. We will be having 3 stages, and shooting to a maximum of 235 yards. Registration is available on practiscore at:

 

 

Match fee: $30

 

An estimated round count (bring extra of course):

10 slugs

45 birdshot

80 rifle

120 pistol

 

It will likely be very hot. I know everyone gets hot, dirty, sweaty, and wants to bail out as soon as the last shot is fired. We ask that everyone stays through the complete tear-down of the stages, so that everyone can get out of the range as early as possible. Nobody likes to be the last one at the range putting away the final pieces of steel without good company of other shooters!

 

Tom and I send a special thanks to Dave Enloe, who has been very helpful in updating our electronic scoring Nooks. Scoring should go much easier this time around thanks to his help!

 

See you there,

Jake and Tom    mrpcmultigun@gmail.com

 

 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC    NEWS   7-11-17

MRPC NEWS 7-11-17

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

On-Line NewsletteR

Fullbore Rifle Practice

 

We will shoot on the Camp White Range

Wednesday (July 12) at 5PM from 600 yds.

22 rounds or less prone or bench. 

 

We have some decomposed granite to lay down on the 600 yds

shooting bench area, and could use some help spreading it out.

Come a little early on Wednesday to help, even if you don’t shoot.

Frank 541 899 6872

 

 

Range Cleaning Crew Needs Help

Do you have time on Monday Afternoons to help push around the HEPA Vacuum?

Please contact Steve Sampson, Club Vice-President if you have time to help.

Steve Sampson (sampson4wd@aol.com)

More Hands Make Light Work—Help Out!

 

 

LOST KEYS

3 keys on a talon key chain with skull were lost Sunday

at the Steel Match, Jackson County Sports Park range.

 

Help a shooter out!

Contact—-Alex Neuman at Guns R Us.

 

 

 

USPSA Match

This SUNDAY at 8am at the Sports Park Competition Ranges

 

WE WILL NEED MORE VOLUNTEERS FOR MATCH SET UP.

WHICH IS NORMALLY THE DAY BEFORE THE MATCH

@ 9:00 A.M. SATURDAY MORNING

If you can swing a hammer, or help carry some wood, you can help!

 

 

 

<img width="487" height="241" id="Picture_x0020_5" src="http://mrpc.info/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/image001-1.jpg" alt="cid:image001.jpg@01D2F99B.5C45EFA0“>

 

 

Members continue Range Safety Violations at the Range.

 

1.     Do not point your firearm at the concrete floor or walls,

2.     Do not point your firearm at the ceiling.

3.     Do not handle any objects or reload on the shooting bench

          while shooters are downrange.

4.     Stay behind the Shooting Benches when others are shooting

 

·        If holding a firearm at the low ready position,

the barrel of the firearm should still be pointed at the backstop. 

·        A negligent/accidental discharge into the concrete floor or concrete

walls can cause the bullet to fragment and could seriously injure someone

·        Do not point your firearm at our ceiling, it isn’t bullet-proof and we have neighbors.

·        Handling of objects or reloading on the shooting bench while someone is down

          range or on the target side of the bench is strictly prohibited.

          Accidents happen when people of distracted

·        There’s no hurry, wait until they’re back and safely behind the bench

 

Remember these violations may result in injury &/or a loss of range privileges.

                       

                             “Train Safe” to “Stay Safe”

 

 

 

 

 

“FREE” Firearm Classes

OPEN TO MEMBERS AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC

 

·        INTRO TO BASIC PISTOL CLASS— TWO-HOUR

·        INTRO TO PRACTICAL/DEFENSIVE PISTOL CLASS

·        BASIC PISTOL CLINIC—-Hands on Range Time with an Instructor

·        ADVANCED PRACTICAL PISTOL PRACTICE

 

TO RESERVE YOUR PLACE IN A CLASS and more INFORMATION

CONTACT  Phil Grammatica

@  714-749-7216   or    mrpctrainingdirector@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC   NEWs

MRPC NEWs

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

On-Line NewsletteR

FULLBORE RIFLE PRACTICE

We will shoot Wednesday July 5th at the Camp White Range at 5 PM at 600yds.

22 rounds prone or bench.  It is going to be hot but we will give it a try. Frank 541 899 6872

 

 

New Member Orientation

Wednesday July 5th–TONIGHT at 7pm

 

 

STEEL CHALLENGE

SUNDAY July 9th Starts at 9am

Come early to sign-up and help set-up

Reserve & Competition Ranges at

The Jackson County Sports Park

 

 

12 Issues With Extreme Long-Range Shooting

by G&A Staff   |  June 14th, 2017   |  Know the factors and their effect on shooting. 0

12IssuesExtremeLongRangeShooting_F

By Todd Hodnett – Photos by Mark Fingar

The definition of long-range shooting has been redefined over the last few years. We are now pushing further than ever, and not just launching bullets in hopes of seeing splash and making second shot corrections until we hit a target. We’re doing the math and accurately calculating for elevation at extreme ranges. Wind will be wind, so it will always be hard to ensure a perfect wind call at extreme long ranges, but that is what makes long-range shooting challenging.

Rangefinders are better and more affordable. Scopes can dial more accurately and with more vertical adjustment. Ballistic engines, like the Kestrel AB, give us incredible data. So when we talk long-range shooting, we are really talking about problem solving.

These are a few things we need to seriously consider. For these comparisons, we used a .300 Win. Mag. with 190-grain Sierra MatchKing (SMK) ammunition at sea level DA (density altitude).

ISSUE #1

RangeErrors20metersRANGE ERROR
Range errors can occur with most laser rangefinders, and they become a huge problem at extended range. Even with an error of only 20 meters, the difference in drop becomes significant.

THE SOLUTION
One of the best ways to avoid this error is to hit and then miss the target with the laser. If the numbers are the same, there is a good chance you are not hitting the target.
HitMiss

ISSUE #2

ParallaxPARALLAX
Parallax is a huge problem with most of the shooters I train due to their young eyes. By not getting all of the parallax adjusted out of a scope, something as small as .2 mils of parallax could result in a shot being 15.72 inches off.

THE SOLUTION
In addition to focusing the image and reticle onto the same plane by means of a parallax adjustment, another way to remove parallax is to center your eye in the scope. Do this by making sure you have a little scope shadow showing equally all the way around the ocular lens. I even teach students to set up their cheekweld this way. Thus, if you have any
parallax in the scope when you take the shot, you can be assured the reticle is on the target where you perceive it to be.

ISSUE #3

MV_ESMV / ES
Muzzle velocities (MV) and extreme spread (ES) are huge components of hit probability at long range. When shooting a .308 at a mile, I will ignore shots that strike outside the norm of the group the gun is shooting. Here’s why:
Whether you are reloading or have great store-bought ammo, you might expect standard deviation (SD) to be around 7 and ES to be around 20 feet per second (fps). But a lot of ammo may have 40 to 70 fps ES, which, as you can see in the chart, is a point of concern.

THE SOLUTION
Demand quality ammo when shooting long range. Whether it’s factory ammo or precision reloads, make sure the ammo produces consistent muzzle velocities in your rifle. If it doesn’t, use it for short-range applications instead of long range.

ISSUE #4

MV_and_TempsMV AND TEMPS
Muzzle velocity temperature sensitivity is when the velocity can swing wildly with variations in temperature. We have seen as much as 160 fps in a 100-degree swing. We have even seen more than 50 fps with a relatively minor swing of 20 degrees. This is not a linear adjustment, so shooters must know the temperature sensitivity of the powder being used.

THE SOLUTION
Getting data at sea level and 80 degrees can have a huge adjustment in elevation calculations when going to 8,000 feet DA in 30-degree weather. The ballistic engine will calculate for the DA portion. But one must have MV temperature tables running for the engine to calculate for the powder temperature sensitivity.
This is similar to ES when calculating hit probability, but it’s actually greater because all of the bullets will be off by this much instead of one out of five being a flyer.

ISSUE #5

Temp_Humidity_DATEMP / HUMIDITY / DA
In sniper manuals, it states that 20 degrees will give a point of impact (POI) shift of 1 minute of angle (MOA). This is true at 1,000 yards but nowhere else. When looking at DA, understand that temperature will give the largest difference in holds at distance. It takes 14 degrees to change your DA by 1,000 feet.
So let’s look at the difference in elevation holds at different distances with 1,000 feet of DA, which is equivalent to a 14-degree temperature change at altitude.

THE SOLUTION
Elevation is consistent, but temperature requires staying on top of changes throughout the day. Inside 500 meters it may not be a big deal, but it begins to be a problem at 1,000 meters and beyond.

ISSUE #6

WindDirectionWIND DIRECTION
Headwinds and tailwinds are of no real consequence at shorter ranges. However, as distances stretch, this variable can affect the time of flight (TOF) to the target, and TOF is everything. We took a 20 mph headwind and tailwind and compared the different actual holds using the Applied Ballistics (AB) engine, which calculates for this variable.

THE SOLUTION
Factor in the direction of wind whenever you shoot long range. Not doing so will result in substantial misses.

ISSUE #7

ClickErrorCLICK ERROR
Because many scopes don’t dial what you put in and some don’t repeat back to zero — dialing 20 mils may only give you 19.6 — you need to perform a calibrated test to measure the impact of each round. At 100 yards, a yardstick is 10 mils. So, if you are square to the target you
should show a 10-mil coverage on the target, and your bullet should move up that much when dialed 10 mils. Any error should be linear.
It could look something like this: At 500 meters, it may be off .1 mil, while at 1,000 meters it may equal .2 mils. Then .3 at 1,500 meters and .4 at 2,000 meters. These click errors quickly accumulate into inches.

THE SOLUTION:
Test your optic and make sure it tracks true. If not, those carefully launched bullets won’t land where they should.

ISSUE #8

SpinDriftAndDOFSPINDRIFT AND DOF
Spindrift is one of the easiest variables to account for, as the ballistic engines do a good job of giving accurate data for it. But let’s look at the same ranges and how much that is in mils and inches.
Direction of fire (DOF), however, is really talking about Coriolis effect. So let’s look at a shot without the correct DOF input. Let’s say we indicate we are shooting north but we are shooting east, which gives us about half the Coriolis effect.

THE SOLUTION
Make darn sure your ballistic engine knows all of the variables. Spindrift, while quite easy to account for, must be factored into the equation. Also, recognize the direction you are shooting. DOF makes a big difference.

ISSUE #9

DragModelsDRAG MODELS
All ballistic engines are not created equal. While standard drag models such as G1 or G7 work fine out to transonic range, they don’t predict what happens in the subsonic realm very well.

THE SOLUTION
Use custom curves that Bryan Litz and Applied Ballistics have tested extensively to determine what your bullet is really doing at range. These engines work extremely well.

ISSUE #10

AerodynamicJumpAERODYNAMIC JUMP
Aerodynamic jump (AJ), or the deflection of a bullet due to wind direction, can play a huge role when shooting out to distance. If one has not accounted for AJ while truing, this could easily incur an error of 30 fps in the MV. Even if the AJ was accounted for while truing, the effect on the bullet can destroy any chances of making shots at long range.
Let’s look at 12 mph, which is small but will account for a .15 mil deviation on target, and see what this means for long range.

THE SOLUTION
Understand what AJ is and how to account for it while shooting long range.

ISSUE #11

BadBCBAD BC
Unfortunately, bullet companies don’t always give you the proper BC one should use in a ballistic computer. Instead, they give the BC at the muzzle. This same error will not affect your ability if you true on any targets you engage out to transonic. However, it is not uncommon to see as much as 2 percent deviation from actual BC to what a company may represent as the stated BC.

THE SOLUTION
Instead of trusting listed BCs, run a drag scale factor (DSF) to morph the predictive and actual algorithms back in line in the subsonic regions. This will provide a much more accurate prediction of what the bullet will do at long range.

ISSUE #12

WindVelocity_CosineWIND VELOCITY / COSINE
Always the nemesis of the long gun, cosine (the way we assign value to wind speed if it’s not blowing perpendicular to the bullet’s path) is a huge problem that gets increasingly difficult with range. Not only is reading wind exponentially harder with range, now we have to get the cosine-determined wind value perfect as well. What I want to show you is math that only relates to a miss estimate of 1 mph. An error of 1 mph wind speed yields this much distance between our expected point of impact and our actual point of impact.

CONCLUSION:
At the end of the day, I am not trying to discourage anyone from extreme longrange shooting. However, I do want to show the challenges in making shots at truly long ranges. And again, I am not talking about shooting and doing corrections until you finally get a hit 50 rounds later. That is not true long range. That is having fun, and there’s nothing wrong with that.
There is a different set of skills that allows a shooter to be “on” at extreme ranges in only a shot or two. This is the sought-after skill in long-range shooting. Even though control or even being aware of all the variables may seem overwhelming, this is the challenge, and accurately calculating for each can be a rewarding feeling.

Read more: http://www.gunsandammo.com/tips-tactics/12-issues-with-extreme-long-range-shooting/#ixzz4kSVOmBSt

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC    NEWS      62017

MRPC NEWS 62017

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

On-Line Newsletter

 

 

Have a Happy 4th of July

 

 

Fullbore Rifle Practice

 

We will shoot at the 600 yard line         Wednesday June 28th

 

On the Camp White Rifle Range at 5PM.

 

22 rounds or less prone or bench.

 

Frank    541 899 6872   frankscar@q.com

 

 

 

 

MRPC FIREARM SAFETY CLASSES

Due to temperature threshold in the range,

the 4th of July, and

the number of individuals signed up,

the Firearm Safety Classes have been re-scheduled to begin July 11, 2017.

 

Sorry for any inconvenience…

 

Phil

 

 

NSSF: Firearm Safety at the Range and Home

Posted on June 16, 2017 by Defender Outdoors Blogger in How To, Firearms, Survival and Preparation Tagged National Shooting Sports Foundation, firearms, safety

This post first appeared on the National Shooting Sports Foundation website. It was written by the NSSF Director of Communications, Bill Brassard. You can view the original here.

Summer—when children are home from school and more likely to be unattended—is an important time to remember that the No. 1 way to help prevent accidents is to securely store your firearms when they’re not in use. Whether you own a gun or not, firearm safety is your responsibility. Let shooting champion and mom Julie Golob explain how to talk to your children about gun safety so they are prepared to quickly make the correct decision if they should encounter an unsecured firearm. Also, we encourage you to share this 30-second public service announcement about NSSF’s Project ChildSafe program and its free gun locks. And, finally, take a moment to watch the videos below on how to safely handle and store firearms. Our Project ChildSafe program offers a host of gun safety materials for your use on its resources webpage.

Firearm Safety: First, Last, Always

There are “10 Commandments” to firearm safety and the first four are the big ones. Remember, while at the shooting range or anywhere you handle a firearm, safety always comes first.

Storing a Gun Safely and Securely

For those who do have a gun in the home, now is also good time to review some gun storage options that fit your lifestyle. For more information on storing your firearms safely and securely, visit ProjectChildSafe.org. Defender Outdoors offers a large selection of Gun Safes, Gun Locks, and Gun Cases to keep your firearms out of the hands of those who should not have them.

 

 

 

STOP 719!

From the Oregon Firearm Federation

http://www.oregonfirearms.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/police.door_-300x168.gif

Imagine this.

You have never been convicted of a crime. In fact, you have never been accused of a crime.

You have not been adjudicated to be mentally ill.

A person with no credentials in mental health claims you are a threat to yourself or them.

A person with no credentials in mental health signs an order you don’t know about.

The police come to your home and tell you to turn over your guns.

This is not a fantasy. This is Brian Boquist’s gun theft SB 719A. one of the most dangerous bills ever to come out of the Oregon Legislature. You must help us stop it.

This bill passed through the Senate on a near party line vote with Boquist being the only Republican to support it. Senator Betsy Johnson was the only Democrat to oppose it. It has now gone over to the House.

House Speaker Tina Kotek has bypassed the House Judiciary Committee fearing they may not march in lockstep with her militant anti-gun agenda and has assigned this bill to the House Rules Committee. As you might imagine, all the Democrats on this committee are anti-gun zealots.  (They are Williamson, Rayfield, Holvey, Nosse, and Warner.)

 

 

 

Watch Their Hands

06.22.17   From the Oregon Firearm Federation

You know in any confrontation, the most important thing to do is watch your opponent’s hands. Their words can’t hurt you, their actions can.

Although the Democrats in the Oregon Legislature announced that the close of the session was “imminent” at the end of May, there is no sign that they will be going home before the Constitutionally mandated end date of July 10.

But as we told you, that announcement allowed both House and Senate Committees to schedule action on bills with virtually no notice.

This session, the big sticking point has been, of course, the Democrats desire to jack up taxes, which they could not do legally without some Republican support. It was this leverage that might have allowed the Republicans to impede the passage of the anti-gun bills that are still alive in the legislature.

The Democrats have found creative ways to pass tax increases without the legally required “super-majority” and the Republicans have started caving in to tax increases they could have stopped.

In the House, Republican Sal Esquivel joined the Democrats to pass HB 2391A, a bill to tax health insurance of all things. When the bill went to the Senate, Republicans Jackie Winters, Fred Girod and Republican leader Ted Ferrioli joined the Democrats and sent the bill to the governor.

These capitulations, and the announced intention of the Democrats not to seek new corporate taxes (which is not a sure thing while they are still in Salem) may very well mean the Democrats can turn their attention to other mischief.

Many of you have contacted OFF asking what the current status of anti-gun bills in Salem are.

Currently, there are two anti-gun bills still in play in Salem. SB 719, the Boquist/Burdick gun confiscation bill, and SB 1065, the Prozanski, Burdick, Williamson omnibus anti-gun bill.

Both of these bills are sitting in committees that do not have deadlines for completing their work, which means they can still take action to pass these gun grabbing bills.

As you may know, anti-gun extremist,  billionaire Mike Bloomberg, is once again pouring money into the state to run ads promoting the anti-gun bills.  You may have heard Multnomah County Sheriff (and Bloomberg lackey) Mike Reese pushing Bloomberg’s agenda on the air.  (Reese has become a reliable mouthpiece for the anti-gun left.)

There is still plenty of time for the committees holding these bills, and the entire legislature, to ram them through.

So we are asking you to do what you can to counter Bloomberg’s money bomb and reach out to the legislature once again in opposition to these dangerous bills.

Even if you have done so in the past, the legislators need to know we are watching them and Bloomberg’s stooges and we won’t stand for more attacks on our rights.

You can take action against SB 719  here:

You can take action against SB 1065 here:

Thank you for your continued support.

Oregon Firearms Federation is entirely funded by your generosity. Please consider making whatever donation you can afford to keep us fighting for you.

Any amount helps.

You can support our efforts here .

Are you receiving alerts but are not yet a member? We’d love to have you join us. For more info click here.

 

 

_________________________________________________

This information is provided to our members solely as a service.  The opinions expressed are not the official position of MRPC, its Board, Officers or Directors.  Each member is encouraged to conduct their own study of these matters.

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC    NEWS

MRPC NEWS

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

ON-LINE NEWSLETTER

 

June General Club Meeting

This Wednesday, 6-21-17 @ 7pm

At the Club’s Indoor Range Meeting Room

 

 

 

 

FULLBORE  RIFLE  PRACTICE

Wednesday, 6-21-2017 @ 5pm

at

Camp White Historic Rifle Range

Off Kershaw Road @ Ja. Co. Sports Park

22 Rounds will be shot Slow Fire from 600 yards

Any Centerfire Rifle, Calibers up to 35 caliber

Prone and Bench Rest Shooting

 

 

 

 

IDPA MATCH

This Weekend  June 24th—8am

Reserve and Competition Ranges of

the Jackson County Sports Park

 

IDPA offers an exciting forum for practical shooters in which truly practical equipment,

techniques and courses of fire are mandated.

Prior to IDPA, there was no place to compete with common service pistols.

There were no shooting sports where your concealed carry holster could also be your match holster without handicap.

When you come to an IDPA match, you can not only use your duty/CCW equipment, you can be completely competitive with it!

Other shooting sports have become equipment “races”; IDPA will not.

If you’re interested in using truly practical pistols to solve challenging and exciting defensive shooting problems,

then IDPA is the sport for you.

Learn more about what makes IDPA great, from the practical skills training rules,

the variety of matches, the wide range of competitors and the ever growing community.

 

More Information Available At :  http://www.idpa.com/

 

 

 

 

This Month’s Steel Challenge Results

Fastest Shooter with Lowest Combined Time Wins

Each Stage is shot 5 times, and the slowest time for each Stage is thrown out.

A total of 5 Stages are shot, and the aggregate time is the Score.

Shooter only compete against other people shooting the same type of firearm. 

 

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PCCO=Pistol Cartridge Carbine Open,   RFRI=Rimfire Rifle, RFPO=Rimfire Pistol Open,   RFRP=Rimfire Rifle Open

RFPI=Rimfire Pistol Iron Sights?,   LTD=CenterFire Pistol Limited/Stock?,   REVI=Centerfire Revolver Iron Sights,

REVO=Centerfire Revolver Open,  (Open =Modified Firearm, Limited=Stock or UnModified Firearm)

 

 

 

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G&A Basics: The Science of Hearing Protection

by B. Gil Horman   |  August 22nd, 2013

 

It is estimated about one in 10 Americans has hearing loss that affects the ability to understand normal speech. The most common cause of this condition is excessive noise exposure. It just so happens shooting firearms is a popular activity that subjects its participants to noise levels intense enough to cause permanent hearing loss, unless the proper precautions are employed.

But how loud can a gun really be? It varies some depending on the firearm and ammunition used, but the sound is more intense than one might think. If we were to measure the report of a rifle, the sound would be checked for the following:

 

Frequency: from low to high sounds, measured in hertz.

Duration: how long the report lasts.

Intensity: how soft or loud a sound is, measured in decibels (dB).

It’s important to note when sound levels are represented in decibels, the increase in sound intensity is expressed in a logarithmic scale. The softest audible sound—near total silence—is represented as 0 dB. A sound 10 times more powerful is 10 dB. A sound 100 times more powerful than near total silence is 20 dB. A sound 1,000 times more powerful than near total silence is 30 dB. This means a change in volume from 150 dB to 140 dB is a more significant reduction in noise intensity than reducing 50 dB to 40 dB.

 

To clarify how loud a sound measured in decibels can be, it’s helpful to have some everyday sound comparisons to work with. Normal conversation occurs at 60 dB. Lawn mowers run at 90 dB, a jet engine at 140 dB, and the noise on a rocket pad during launch pushes the top end of the scale at 180 dB. So where does gunfire land in the lineup? When a gun goes off, the report slams into bare eardrums at 140 dB or more.

Some are incredulous at this revelation, saying there is no way a gun is as loud as a jet engine. However, they are confusing sound duration with sound intensity. The sound of a gunshot only lasts for a fraction of a second, but in that short time, it’s very loud.

How Much Can the Ear Take?
So what level of sound intensity is too loud for the human ear? Most experts agree you would have to be exposed to eight continuous hours of noise at 85 dB to cause permanent hearing loss, but sound spikes of 130 dB or more can cause permanent damage instantly.  This means every shot fired has the potential of damaging the ears of anyone within close hearing range. Again, there will be more incredulity at this information, since readers will say they’ve heard loud noises in the past and can still hear just fine. Here are two important things to remember:

The various tissues of the human body do not respond to duress in the same way

Permanent hearing damage can go unrecognized because it is cumulative in nature.

 

The human body contains an amazing variety of systems, each with specialized tissues to fulfill different tasks. Muscle tissue, for example, can become stronger after being strained. The first time you try a new physical activity—rock climbing, surfing or ballroom dancing, for example—muscles that have not been used quite that way before will become sore and tired. If the activity is continued over time, the muscles will adapt and become stronger. Eventually you will be able to continue those activities without becoming sore like you were the first time. In other words, our muscles adapt and become stronger.

However, the specialized tissues of the nervous system—including brain functions and hearing—do not respond to abuse by rebuilding themselves to become stronger. Instead, when they take enough abuse, they lose their functionality for the rest of a person’s life.

 

For example, think of all the professional boxers over the years who were amazing athletes in their prime, but were left with crippling brain damage by the end of their careers. They successfully toughened their muscles to Olympic-competition levels, but their brains slamming against the interior of their skulls with each blow taken to the head caused irreparable harm. It doesn’t usually happen in a single fight—although it can—but brain damage adds up over time. It’s exactly the same process with hearing loss. Each loud sound—whether in short or sustained bursts—is like a punch to the ear. It may not seem like a big deal at the moment, but it adds up over time.

 

Because hearing loss is painless and gradual, it can go unnoticed until the loss—or related symptoms—are quite severe. Many people think losing hearing is like turning down the volume on a television set; all the sounds get softer and softer until you hear nothing at all. That’s not the case, especially with noise exposure. What loud noises can do is punch holes in your hearing at certain spots along the frequency line. I know one sportsman who was shooting a particular gun almost every weekend for several seasons without hearing protection. When he did get his hearing checked, sure enough, along with some general hearing loss he had a gap (i.e., deafness) right at the sound frequency produced by his gun and ammunition combination. Ears do not get tougher with exposure to noise; they just stop working.

 

Besides hearing loss, there’s the symptom of tinnitus. From the Latin word for “ringing,” tinnitus is the perception of a sound when no external sound source is present. Don’t panic if you’ve had a little ringing in your ears at some point, that’s normal. However, if you are around noise loud enough to cause your ears to ring, it’s a good indicator that your hearing is in danger of damage. If enough damage is done, the ringing may not go away.

 

How to Protect Your Hearing
So how exactly should shooters go about keeping their ears safe? The obvious answer is to use hearing protection devices like sound muffling earplugs and earmuffs. These items should have a sound-reduction rating on the package shown in decibels (e.g., 21 dB, 30dB). The higher the number, the more noise they block.   But if guns make 140 dB of noise, how is a 30 dB plug going to help? First, the noise tends to travel forward of the muzzle, so the shooter’s ears are not always hit by as much noise as the gun produces. This does not mean the level of sound is safe—only reduced. Second, the purpose of hearing protection devices is not to eliminate sound, but to reduce the impact to a level that does not cause lasting damage. In short, a plethora of scientific studies  conducted over many years show hearing protection works, and it works at the sound-muffling levels common devices provide.

With hearing protection so high on the must-have list these days, most shooting ranges will have some form of hearing protection on hand for their customers. Hardware stores and gun stores also have a variety of options in stock. The cheapest form of hearing protection at pennies apiece are the disposable foam earplugs, which usually provide somewhere between 25-31 dB of hearing protection. Reusable rubber-type plugs are also available, ranging from $5-15, depending on the make and model.

 

The next step up from ear plugs are the ear-protecting muffs, which have the advantage of being reusable for years. The basic clamp-over-the-ear units can run from $10-40, providing the same 25-31 dB levels of hearing protection as the foam plugs. A popular option in really noisy areas like the indoor ranges is to use both plugs and muffs. This is a good idea, but understand the limitations of this system. A 30 dB plug and a 30 dB muff together do not provide a cumulative 60 dB of hearing protection. Instead, they each act as a separate barrier the sound must travel through successively. Hearing protection is improved, but not to as high a level as one might think.

Finally, there are electronically-enhanced hearing protection devices, including specialized hearing aid/earplug combinations, and earmuffs fitted with external microphones and internal speakers. The sound system in electronic muffs allows the user to hear surrounding sounds at a normal levels, or even louder than normal. When a dangerously loud sound is detected by the electronics, the speakers to the ears are deactivated until the noise reaches a safe level again. Prices for these systems range from as little as $50 to thousands of dollars, depending on what you’re looking for.

A Personal Matter
When I was approached by Guns & Ammo to write this piece, I hoped they wanted me on the job because of my witty prose and unquenchable enthusiasm for shooting. But in the end, they just wanted me for my body. You see, I have a moderate-to-severe bilateral hearing loss of over 60 dB in the 500 to 2,000 hertz range, along with symptoms of tinnitus. That means I wear hearing aids in both ears to help me understand what people have to say, and I have ringing in my ears.

My hearing loss is genetic in nature, which means there was nothing I could have done to avoid it. It’s a little gift from my DNA that kicked in about 17 years ago, but the symptoms are just the same as those caused by loud noise exposure. I was careful to protect my hearing before the loss, but I’m religious about taking care of what I have left now.

Is the Tinnitus annoying? Yes, on good days it’s only annoying. Do I miss hearing and understanding what my wife, kids and co-workers have to say? Only when they choose to speak to me. Don’t the cutting-edge digital hearing aids help? Yes, and they’re a real bargain at $1,400-3,000 apiece, plus the cost of replacement every three years or so, batteries, maintenance, service charges, and hearing checks.

 

While it may be better to have loved and lost than to never have loved at all, I just can’t come up with any reason why losing hearing would be plus. Ear protection is far too easy to obtain and use for anyone to have a good reason to gamble with their hearing. So what is your hearing worth? The last I checked, you can start protecting it for as little as 25 cents (foam plugs) per trip to the range. Take it from me, it’s well worth the investment.

 

 

 

 

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MRPC    NEWS    62017

MRPC NEWS 62017

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

On-Line NewsletteR

Sunday June 11th at 9:00am

June Steel Challenge

Fast and Furious

 

Come early to register and help Set –up  8:30am

 

New Shooters Welcome

Open to Club Members and the General Public

 

Entry Fee:   $15 includes range fee and raffle entry

 

5 Stages of Steel Targets, Shot 5 Times equals a minimum of 125 rounds

Rimfire or Centerfire Firearms, Semi-Auto or Revolver,

There’s even classes for 22 Rifles and Pistol Cartridge Carbines 

A class for all shooters and all firearms

 

Lots of Fun   Learn how to be Accurate and Fast !

 

Held at Reserve and Competition Ranges at the Jackson County Sports Park

South off the corner of Corey and Kershaw Roads. 

Do not pay at the Public Range Entrance, but tell the Public Range Entry Staff

that your coming to the Match.  The ranges are through the gate at the

south end of public ranges.

 

Dress for the Weather—Hats, Sun-Screen, Water

 

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

 

 

FULLBORE RIFLE PRACTICE

Wednesday 5pm at the Historic Camp White Military Rifle Range

Up to 22 rounds from 600 yards

 

Through the Sports Park’s White Steel on the east side of Kershaw

Road, south of Hwy 140 to Klamath.  Follow the road to the left.

Range is between the Drag Strip and the Circle Track

 

Dress for the Weather—Hats, Sun-Screen, Water

 

If you can help,

please show up at 3:30pm (before we shoot)

with a weed-eater so that we can mow the Impact Area

 

Frank   541-899-6872

 

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

 

 

OREGON CHL Class

Saturday June 10th, 2017 @ 9:00 am – 15:00 pm
Medford Rifle & Pistol Club, 1253 E Vilas Rd, Central Point, OR 97502, USA

TO RESERVE YOUR PLACE IN THE CLASS CONTACT  Phil Grammatica <mrpctrainingdirector@yahoo.com>

 

MRPC offers the Oregon CHL class to Club members at a discounted cost of $25.00, including all materials.

Members can add the Arizona CCW for only $25.00 when combined with the Oregon CHL class.

Includes the required 2 sets of fingerprints for the Arizona Permit.

The Arizona CCW is recognized 35 states, including the State of Nevada.

The price of a standalone Arizona CCW class is $30 for members, again including the required 2 sets of fingerprints.

 

During the class, the range will be OPEN TO MEMBER USE EXCEPT FROM 1330 – 1500

 

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

 

Video:

NSSF Hosts Media for Suppressor Demonstration

 

http://blog.cheaperthandirt.com/video-nssf-hosts-media-suppressor-demonstration/?utm_source=emarsys&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Chronicle+060317-Video%3A+NSSF+Hosts+Media+for+Suppressor+Demonstration-2017-06-03+22%3A00%3A00&sc_src=email_1667327&sc_lid=108520337&sc_uid=VKA4pmWBCj&sc_llid=659438&sc_eh=9f433081d0ae7a6c1

 

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

 

 

Take Advantage of the Club’s FREE Firearm Classes

OPEN TO MEMBERS AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC

 

·        INTRO TO BASIC PISTOL CLASS— TWO-HOUR

·        INTRO TO PRACTICAL/DEFENSIVE PISTOL CLASS

·        BASIC PISTOL CLINIC—-Hands on Range Time with an Instructor

·        ADVANCED PRACTICAL PISTOL PRACTICE

 

TO RESERVE YOUR PLACE IN A CLASS and more INFORMATION

CONTACT

Phil Grammatica @  714-749-7216   or    mrpctrainingdirector@yahoo.com

 

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

 

NSSF’s

Project “ChildSafe”

 

Share this Video with Parents and Grandparents!

 

How you talk about Guns and Gun Safety is very important!

 

http://projectchildsafe.org/talking-to-kids

 

 

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

 

Klamath/Keno June 25th MULTI-GUN

Hello everybody        The next 3 gun is rapidly approaching.

Keno Sportspark

Hwy 66 just east of the Klamath River.

However watch for ODOT construction on Hwy 66

You may want to take 140 or Dead Indian

Match Fee -$20
Setup time Saturday June 24nd after 5:00p.m. and Sunday 8:00 a.m.
Sign up starts at 9:00a.m. shooting starts at 9:30ish.
We will have lunch after the match.

The rules from USPSA multigun will be used.  We allow for Rimfire or PCC or Trooper at the club level.

4 – Stages fast and simple.

We will be using the newly graveled multi purpose range.

This will be an easier match with more focus on transitions, reduced size/range rifle targets and  a spinner(the bane of all).


All three guns can be used on almost every stage.
Paper targets – Rifle or Pistol
Steel targets –  Pistol or Shotgun.

Clays           – Shotgun

 

Round Counts

Rifle       – 14-42

Shotgun –  12-38

Pistol     –  8-52

 

 

The round counts are based off of 1 round per target  (bring 2x is good insurance)

The targets/stages allow you to use more pistol or shotgun or rifle depending on your preference.

If you shoot more with the shotgun, the pistol will be less, and like-wise if you shoot more rifle, the pistol will be less.

I will have the actual stages for the next email I send out.

As always
No steel core or bimetal bullets(magnets will be available if in doubt- DQ and repair cost for damaged targets)
No steel bird shot
No shotgun ammo greater than #6 shot (#7-9 are ok) or faster than 1300fps
I hope to see you at the match

Josh

Any questions or concerns just let me know.

JSSA Multigun <jssamultigun@gmail.com>

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

 

 

 

https://www.federalpremium.com/premium_moments/Stories.aspx?title=5+Handgun+Hacks

 

https://www.federalpremium.com/premium_moments/images/feature/Story_39_Image_0.jpeg

HICKOK45

He’s a legend on YouTube for his ability to teach the world about firearms—

but he’s a great shot as well. Hickok45 shares his five secrets to better handgun accuracy.

Handguns may be some of the smallest weapons in your arsenal, but they often present the biggest challenges when you’re shooting for consistent, tack-driving accuracy. It’s no wonder, either. A light, short-barreled firearm with open sights and a trigger pull heavier than the gun itself isn’t exactly the best platform for showcasing your long-range marksmanship.

Still, much of what ultimately dictates accuracy lies in the hands of the beholder.

Just ask Hickok45. Legions of shooters look to the YouTube firearms reviewer for straightforward advice on guns. While many of his videos assess the merits and performance of specific firearms, he’s also an accomplished shooter—with a full chamber of tricks for putting more rounds on target.

Following are his five top tips to improve handgun accuracy, whether you’re hunting, competing, plinking or neutralizing a threat.

Master Trigger Pull
Hickok45 acknowledges many dynamics of shooting form play a role breaking the bullseye or dropping your target, but he says one factor rises above all others.

“Of all the elements of accuracy, having the trigger break at the right time—when your sights are aligned exactly where you want them—is the most important to me, bar none,” he begins. “Ultimately, it all comes down to the sight being on target when the trigger breaks and the primer fires.

“You can be in a comfortable stance with a good grip and the gun steady, doing everything right,” he continues. “But if you flinch and your sight alignment moves off the target, accuracy takes a nosedive.”

“Ultimately, it all comes down to the sight being on target when the trigger breaks and the primer fires.”

Techniques for taming trigger pull include a variety of breath-control and finger-squeezing strategies. Hickok45 recommends using whatever you’re most comfortable with, but says no matter which approach you adopt, dry-firing practice is a great way to hone your ability to squeeze the trigger without taking your sights off the target.

He also advocates double-checking your steadiness. And the best way to do that, he maintains, is adding dummy rounds to your practice routine.

“Dummy rounds, which contain no primer or propellant, are great tools for testing your trigger pull,” he says. “Randomly mixing a few dummy rounds with live ammunition will reveal what’s really going on at the moment of truth. If you’re jerking the trigger, you’ll know it, because there’s no recoil to hide your sins.”

Get A Grip
How you hold a handgun affects accuracy. Here, too, there’s no shortage of techniques to choose from, and Hickok45 advises experimenting with different holds until you find the right fit for your specific firearm, stature and style of shooting.

“Keeping my little finger out of the equation helps avoid stringing shots laterally or milking the trigger.”

“I prefer a nice, firm grip,” he says, noting that regardless of the gun in hand, he keeps his pinky off the grip. “Keeping my little finger out of the equation helps avoid stringing shots laterally or milking the trigger. It also works equally well with subcompacts and full-size pistols, so there’s no need to alter your grip when switching from one style to another.”

Above all, he cautions against taking too firm a grip. “Some people hold a gun like they’re trying to choke the life out of it,” he says. “A solid hold is fine, but too tight of a death grip can adversely affect accuracy by increasing the tendency to pull down as you squeeze the trigger.”

Take A Stand
Although foot position doesn’t trump trigger pull, Hickok45 says it remains a boon to accuracy.

“Stance is important,” he says. “I like a modified Weaver stance, with my right foot a little behind the left. But everybody’s different. The best advice is to choose a solid stance that feels natural and keeps your feet shoulder width apart. Practice until it becomes second nature to stand that way when you shoot.”

http://www.federalpremium.com/premium_moments/images/moments/PremMoments_Hickok45_930x522_2.jpg

Practice, Then Repeat
“When I was teaching, I’d tell my students ‘repetition, repetition, repetition’ is the key to learning,” he recalls with a laugh.

“It’s the same with developing accurate shooting habits. However you shoot, be consistent about it and practice as much as possible. Even if you’re doing something the experts might think is wrong—like a side-arm quarterback or unconventional free-throw shooter—if you do it enough, you’ll eventually get pretty good at it.”

Load Smart
“I strongly encourage practicing with ammunition that’s either exactly the same or has an equivalent bullet weight and power ratio to the ammo you’ll carry afield or in competition and self-defense situations,” he says. “Otherwise, you risk variations in point of impact and performance that can really throw you off when the chips are down.”

Toward that end, he chooses ammunition readily available in both range and carry rounds. “That’s one reason I like middle-of-the-road rounds like 180-grain, 40-caliber. It offers lots of good practice and carry ammo in the same bullet weight,” he says.

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC News from Klamath plus

 

Klamath Speed Steel

This Saturday June 3rd  8:00am

 

 

Klamath USPSA

Greeting Shooters!

Our next match is this Sunday, June 4th

We will shoot 5 stages, ~135 rounds.

 

We have new gravel and a new look! It’s amazing!

Registration is 0900-0920

(to give us time to create squads and set up the Nooks)

Please arrive and register before 0920,

Match Starts at 0930.

 

$20 match fee (juniors are $10).

Match setup is the day before,

after the Speed Steel match in the morning at 0800.

Please remember to sign-in and or pay the day-use fee at the kiosk as required.

For More Information Contact  Jake @ jspsuspsa@gmail.com

 

See Attachment for SOPSA NEWS

Upcoming Local Events in Medford

 

 

If you know a member who doesn’t get Club Newsletters,

Tell them to check their e-mail address of record in their

Membership PROFILE page of the club’s website.

WWW.MRPC.INFO

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC     NEWS

MRPC NEWS

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

On-Line NewsletteR   

Fullbore Rifle

 

We will shoot at 600 yards on the Camp White Range

at 5 PM this Wednesday—-TODAY

22 rounds or less prone or bench. Frank 541 899 6872

From… Frank Scarlata      frankscar@q.com

 

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

 

 

Members continue to commit

Range Safety Violations at the Range.

 

“Train Safe” to “Stay Safe”

1.     Do not point your firearm at the concrete floor or walls,

2.     Do not point your firearm at the ceiling.

3.     Do not handle any objects on the shooting bench

while shooters are downrange.

4.     Stay behind the Shooting Benches when others are shooting

 

If holding a firearm at the low ready position,

the barrel of the firearm should still be pointed at the backstop. 

A negligent discharge into the concrete floor or concrete will walls

can cause the bullet to fragment and could seriously injure someone. 

Do not point your firearm at the ceiling, it isn’t bullet-proof

 

Handling of objects on the shooting bench

while someone is down range or on the target side of the bench

is strictly prohibited.

There’s no hurry, wait until they’re back and safely behind the bench

 

Remember these violations may result in injury &/or a loss of range privileges.

 

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

 

Take Advantage of the Club’s FREE Firearm Classes

OPEN TO MEMBERS AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC

 

·        INTRO TO BASIC PISTOL CLASS— TWO-HOUR

·        INTRO TO PRACTICAL/DEFENSIVE PISTOL CLASS

·        BASIC PISTOL CLINIC—-Hands on Range Time with an Instructor

·        ADVANCED PRACTICAL PISTOL PRACTICE

 

TO RESERVE YOUR PLACE IN A CLASS and more INFORMATION

CONTACT

Phil Grammatica @  714-749-7216   or    mrpctrainingdirector@yahoo.com

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

 

 

Are you ready for F-Class?

by Larry Bartholome – Wednesday, May 24, 2017

You have your rifle, mat, front rest or bipod, rear bag, and ammo ready to shoot in your first F-Class match. But are you really ready? While you read this, picture in your mind’s eye that you have all the items I listed in my first sentence already on the firing line in place.

Now, what else should you have handy? Drawing a blank, or has your mind misfired? Let me help. How are you going to keep score? What if it rains? How do you get your gear down to the 800 yard line if they don’t allow you to drive your vehicle? There are many things most newer shooters don’t consider before going to their first big match. No problem! I’m here to help.

https://assets.ssusa.org/media/1536478/plot-sheet.jpg

Simplified 600 or 1000 yard F-Class plot sheet. Photo by North State Shooting Club.

In order to keep score you are going to need a pen to write with. A backup or two would be even better. I have given away more Berger pens in the last 11 years to people scoring me than I can count, even if I had 10 hands and feet. A small clipboard would be nice to go with the pen. Blank plot sheets when you are firing are handy to write down your score and scope settings when you are done shooting (you can download free plot sheets for printing at home from the North State Shooting Club website).

Oh yes, before I forget where are your earmuffs and/or your plugs? Do you have spares? Particularly plugs. What if you left your muffs in the car? Always keep spare plugs in you rifle case or stool. Take them to the pits! Speaking of a shooting stool, they are always nice to have. You can put your miscellaneous items in it and have a place to sit to boot. Don’t forget your hat and always wear glasses while shooting. Side blinders to fit on your glasses are always handy to keep the sun out of your eyes. How much time do you have to shoot? Don’t you think a stopwatch of some kind would be nice to have on occasion?

If it rains, keep the following as dry as you can in this order: ammo, rifle, scorecard, yourself and then the rest of your gear. To keep your ammo, rifle and scorecards dry while shooting I suggest a thin sheet of clear plastic big enough to cover your riflescope from front to back (see the example pictured at the top of this article). This sheet plastic is available in many fabric stores including Wally World on long rolls 36 inches wide. Cut the plastic so it covers the scope/action area and off the sides to keep your ammo/score sheets dry. I put Velcro on my scope and stock to hold it in place and tuck it under my ammo box to hold in place. The other side I use my clipboard. You will need to experiment with your setup ahead of time.

 

A DIY solution for hauling gear.

Many F-Class shooters use their riflescope to score with, in some cases this is not possible, so a spotting scope is another item you should have. Since we are accumulating a lot of stuff, some of which is pretty heavy, it would be very nice to have a cart of some kind to haul it around. I prefer the “fold-it” cart, as do many shooters, but there are many foldable lightweight carts available from about $50 up. Additionally, sunblock of some kind is a needed item that is often forgotten.

If your range has pits with pulled targets, you should have work gloves and perhaps a large diameter (5/8-inch) piece of rope five to six feet long with knots in it to help pull the target down and up. Always wear a hat and glasses in the pits to shade your eyes from spindle spatter in case one gets hit.

As you can see, there are many things you need to consider prior to shooting your first match.  Even if you forget something, just have fun and shoot.

 

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

 

OREGON CHL Class

Saturday June 10th, 2017 @ 9:00 am – 15:00 pm
Medford Rifle & Pistol Club, 1253 E Vilas Rd, Central Point, OR 97502, USA

TO RESERVE YOUR PLACE IN THE CLASS CONTACT  Phil Grammatica <mrpctrainingdirector@yahoo.com>

 

MRPC offers the Oregon CHL class to Club members at a discounted cost of $25.00, including all materials.

Members can add the Arizona CCW for only $25.00 when combined with the Oregon CHL class.

Includes the required 2 sets of fingerprints for the Arizona Permit.

The Arizona CCW is recognized 35 states, including the State of Nevada.

The price of a standalone Arizona CCW class is $30 for members, again including the required 2 sets of fingerprints.

 

During the class, the range will be OPEN TO MEMBER USE EXCEPT FROM 1330 – 1500

 

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

 

 

5 Home-Defense Shotgun Tips and Accessories

By Dave Dolbee published on May 26, 2017 in Safety and Training, Videos

 

The number of debates surrounding which firearm is best for home defense is likely only bested the great 9mm v. .45 ACP argument. At the end of the day, it boils down to your personal means, preferences, and situation. Personally, I do not believe in limiting myself. Why choose between a handgun, shotgun, or AR, when I can have them all? That is to say, in the appropriate places, within reach at the right time, and properly secured, I like the strategy of having all three. That being said, I could make a case for only having an AR, shotgun, or pistol. It is not so much the choice of weapon, but the ammo selection and most importantly, personal ability that are likely the key factors when choosing a firearm for home defense. However, you can’t wrong with a shotgun to defend the castle.

DP-12 Shotgun right profile black

The DP-12 has two 7-round magazine tubes and two barrels. It’s a double-barrel pump gun. Pump once and shoot twice!

For those considering a shotgun, there is no shortage of arguments in your favor. Since its invention, the shotgun has served a defensive and offensive role in law enforcement, military duty, and personal defense. It is truly a multipurpose weapon. In the hands of a seasoned shotgunner, it offers a level of precision whether breaking clays or on the tactical shotgun course. The same shotgun can then be wielded by the neophyte and offer better accuracy than the handgun or rifle in a tactical, close quarters confrontation.

The sound of shotgun’s pump action being operated can be enough deterrent to stop a fight. The shotgun’s payload is a fight stopper. Semi-automatic, pump, double barrel, or one of the new modern offerings that combines these features, such as the DP-12 or Kel-Tec KSG, whichever you choose, here are 5 points to consider.

Recoil

Recoil is a force to be reckoned with, but it is not the deal breaker most think. I have seen sub 100-pound women run a course of clays, not to mention that young girl the majority of us have seen social media. She is 13 years old and cleans a 3-gun course with an ACR, Benelli 12 gauge, and Smith and Wesson M&P (check out the video). I think that is proof enough, but it is not what the young girl can do, it is what you or your loved ones can do. If the recoil of a 12 gauge is too much, drop down to a 20 gauge or even a .410. True, most do not consider the .410 shotgun, but think of what it can do from a Taurus Judge.

Slings

Slings are not normally pictured with home defense shotguns, because few feel they would need one. Perhaps, that is simply because they have never considered the utility of a sling. Let’s start with the potential downside, because that is what most would address first. The sling could be noisy and possible give away your position.

On the other hand, there are dozens of scenarios where you may need both hands free. Opening a padlock while checking your property, tending a wounded loved one before the police or EMS arrives… Also, in a worst-case scenario where you were fighting for control of the shotgun, a sling can be an asset. And what about beyond the home in a survival situation, civil disorder, or should a riot or mob ever approach your home. These are somewhat far fetch scenarios I’ll admit. I am not necessarily recommending a sling, but it is something to consider.

Spare Ammunition

Long, drawn-out gunfights are a thing of the movies, but in the intro to this story I did mention double barrels for home defense. Standard sporting shotguns with a plug would be limited to three shots, and other range in the number of rounds they can hold. I think this falls into the category of, “I’d rather have it and not need it then need it and not have it.” We hope for the best, but prepare for the worst.

Interstate Arms Hawk 12 gauge shotgun right profile

The IAC Hawk closely resembles a Remington 870 with a couple of upgrades and a much lower price tag.

Here is a case where a sling can do double duty and serve as a bandolier. Other models have sidesaddle that are attached to the action or elastic or neoprene carriers affixed around the stock. Of course, in the case of the modern tactical model carrying 15 or rounds, you have a heavy weapon, but one that should be ready without the worry of reloading.

Another advantage of spare ammunition is the ability to have different types of loads at the ready including, birdshot, buckshot and slugs.

Shotgun Fit

This one is a biggie and probably the most overlooked. I’ll admit, I have recommended and sold a fair number of shotguns for home defense without asking all of the questions. Most often, the purchaser is concerned with price point, a few features, and not much else. Shotguns do need to be aimed—to a degree, this is an entire topic of its own.

Mossberg 500 JIC Flex 57340 6-Shot 12 gauge shotgun

The Mossberg 500 JIC Flex fits the bill for close-quarters maneuverability. The small size also makes it easy to store in a vehicle or motorhome when travelling.

The problem arises when a 6’2” man goes out and buys a shotgun, takes it to the range and then readies it in the home for defense. What about the lady of the house? If she went to the range, our big strapping hero probably loaded it up and pointed her in a safe direction to take her 12 gauge pummeling with a gun fit for him. Did he ever think, in his absence or when injured, she would be the main person to defend the home, children, treasure?

Let’s say our hero is married to a 5’1” woman. A shotgun with a telescoping stock is a great solution. It allows you both to have the proper fit. Otherwise, unless you shoot a shotgun with a similar length of pull, spend a few bucks and have a gunsmith fit the gun the shooter with a shorter length of pull. Remember, you’ll do better shooting a shotgun that is too short than you will trying to shoot one that is too long.

Training

There is an art to shooting a shotgun well. Fortunately, compared to other firearms, the learning curve is fast to become proficient. That does not mean a trip to the range once a year is sufficient. A home defense shotgun is potentially the last thing that stops the wolf from blowing your house down and harming everyone inside. The last defense… Do you really think a box of ammo once a year is sufficient?

Consider different shotgun courses. Look into sporting courses that will teach you to shoot a shotgun accurately. Then advance to tactical course that will teach you, and anyone in the home—yes, make it a family affair—to use it to defend your home.

One of the most dangerous myths regarding the defensive shotgun is that a person can just poke it in the general direction of the target and hit dead center. Sadly, such is definitely not the case. The shotgun must be aimed if one expects to hit the intended target.

A shotgun for home defense is a wise choice. Whether you rely solely on it, or as one part of your home defense strategy depends on you and your situation. Remember, we hope for the best, but prepare for the worst. Should the wolf ever come knocking, I have a great recipe for roasted wolf…

What firearm or firearms do you keep for home defense? What training courses have you attended? Do you have a home defense shotgun tip? Share your answers in the comment section.

SLRule

Growing up in Pennsylvania’s game-rich Allegany region, Dave Dolbee was introduced to whitetail hunting at a young age. At age 19 he bought his first bow while serving in the U.S. Navy, and began bowhunting after returning from Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. Dave was a sponsored Pro Staff Shooter for several top archery companies during the 1990s and an Olympic hopeful holding up to 16 archery records at one point. During Dave’s writing career, he has written for several smaller publications as well as many major content providers such as Guns & Ammo, Shooting Times, Outdoor Life, Petersen’s Hunting, Rifle Shooter, Petersen’s Bowhunting, Bowhunter, Game & Fish magazines, Handguns, F.O.P Fraternal Order of Police, Archery Business, SHOT Business, OutdoorRoadmap.com, TheGearExpert.com and others. Dave is currently a staff writer for Cheaper Than Dirt!

 

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MRPC NEWS

FULLBORE RIFLE PRACTICE

We will shoot this Wednesday the 24th on the Camp White Historic Rifle Range

Starting at 5 pm at 600 yards, you can shoot prone or bench.

22 rounds or less.

If you come late after 5 you can still shoot, we will put you in the last relay.

Frank 541 899 6872

 

Any Center Fire Rifle, Any Sights

 

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IDPA MATCH

International Defensive Pistol Association

 

Saturday May 27th

Starts at 9:30am   Come Early to Register

At the Reserve and Competition Pistol Ranges

Of The Jackson County Sports Park

 

Set-Up is Friday Afternoon May 26th

Contact Leif Johnson 541-890-1195 for more information

 

 

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A MISSING TIMER!

 

A shot timer was discovered missing following last weekend’s USPSA match.

If you attended the match or know someone who did, please help us locate the missing timer.

Please spread the word.    If located, please contact

either Tom Howard at  howardts@charter.net   or Eric Hill 530-598-8833 or cle150@att.net

Thanks.

 

 

 

 

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Klamath Defensive Shooting

Contact McKellar Jon <mck508@charter.net>

 

There will be a shoot on Sunday May 28th.

Four stages.

In June, we will have a three-gun match on the fourth Sunday

And a Defensive Shoot on the Third Sunday of the month.


Aloha
Jon

 

 

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Logo

Oregon’s Only No Compromise Gun Rights Organization

 

https://i0.wp.com/imgssl.constantcontact.com/letters/images/sys/S.gif?resize=5%2C1&ssl=1

 

 

05.22.17

The legislature’s three leading gun grabbers have introduced yet another omnibus anti-gun bill. This one, SB 1065 includes language from several previous anti-gun bills that died due to a procedural error made by Floyd Prozanski, a sponsor of this bill.

The bill is a 26 page monstrosity, but here are the lowlights.

Among many other things this bill does, it nearly quintuples the length of time the State Police can deny you a firearms transfer with no cause.

It also drastically complicates the process for getting a concealed handgun license . Online classes will be prohibited unless the class is provided by the NRA or an "Oregon law enforcement agency or association. "

There are currently many other online class options for CHL courses. This bill would prohibit them all and give an almost exclusive online monopoly to NRA and the Oregon State Sheriffs Association.

(It’s interesting to note that several years ago, NRA informed its instructors that if instructors offered their own online classes they risked having their certification revoked.  More recently NRA changed their rules so that NRA classes could only be completed by students who took the NRA’s online class. Even more recently, NRA reversed course again and agreed to allow certified NRA instructors to give complete NRA classes.)

The bill also requires live fire, something many NRA instructors are not in a position to offer, and it requires "training in the safe loading, unloading, storing and carrying of handguns and information on Oregon and relevant federal laws governing the lawful use of a firearm, including self-defense, the use of force, including deadly force, and the transportation and concealment of handguns."

While NRA instructors should certainly be qualified to train in loading, unloading and carrying of handguns, (and we hope this would be a normal part of any class), very few are qualified to teach Oregon laws and, in fact, NRA discourages instructors from getting into a discussion of statutes. Nowhere in this bill is there any discussion of what would make a person qualified to teach Oregon and Federal laws on self defense, or the use of force or deadly force. Not only would this bill prevent most instructors from teaching a CHL class to begin with, since most don’t have ranges, but the potential liability to instructors is staggering.

We have no doubts that, should this bill pass, we will soon be faced with a requirement that CHL classes must be taught by lawyers. Think about the restrictions that will place on class availability and the added expense.

Of course, there is nothing that has happened in the almost 30 years that Oregon has offered CHL’s that indicates any of this is necessary.

This bill does many other bad things and has serious technical flaws, but its clear intent is to create more obstacles and impediments to lawful firearms ownership.

Please take action now and tell the Oregon Senate to vote no on SB 1065.

 

New Jersey State Police Sue Gun Maker,

Citing Defective Handguns

The lawsuit says that many of the guns malfunctioned by not ejecting shell casings when fired.

Author: Associated Press

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — New Jersey has sued gun manufacturer Sig Sauer, saying it sold defective handguns to the state police.

The company, based in Newington, New Hampshire, sold 3,000 handguns to New Jersey State Police for nearly $2 million.

But the lawsuit says that when the weapons were delivered in 2014, many of the guns malfunctioned by not ejecting shell casings when fired.

The lawsuit says Sig Sauer failed to provide new guns to the state by an agreed-upon date.

New Hampshire Public Radio reports that the New Jersey attorney general has filed a breach of contract complaint,

seeking a refund, plus nearly $900,000 to cover the cost of purchased holsters.

Sig Sauer didn’t respond to a request for comment.

 

 

 

 

Special Ops Gadgets for Elite Military Teams

It’s like a supermarket for Navy SEALs. A grocery store for Green Berets. A Costco for commandos.

 

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — It’s a conference for military special operations forces and their gadgets, weapons and tools. The Special Operations Forces Industry Conference is held yearly in Tampa. Here, the U.S. Special Operations Command — the Tampa-based unit that oversees all of the nation’s elite military teams — shops for equipment.

Lantern-jawed Marines in camo mingle with computer geeks in chinos who run complex intel programs on the convention floor. Panels such as "Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit Sessions" are popular, and alphabet soup acronyms are common in casual conversation ("Are you going to the USSOCOM J-Code Directors Panel?").

Outside the convention center, maritime displays of sleek boats with mounted weapons cruise by, and underwater drones surface.

Prototypes of new gadgets and gear are showcased. Robots, holograms, tanks, lethal weapons — it’s all on display.

Here are some of the interesting gadgets that were on the trade show floor during the weeklong event, which wraps up Friday.

Underwater Drones

Deep Trekker is a Canadian company that sells underwater drones. The small grey cylinders with cameras can be remote-controlled on land or in the water, and Sam MacDonald, president, says the device can dive down 150 meters — it’s great for hull inspection or contraband, checking out port security.

"We’ve also had it used in the Special Forces, for things they can’t really tell us a lot about," she said.

Bomb Disposal

Joseph Smith of Massachusetts-based Endeavor Robotics smiled patiently when a reporter asked whether his company’s robots were in any way like the ubiquitous Roomba vacuums. At more than $100,000 each, the 510 Packbot overcomes stairs, obstacles and debris. It can reach speeds of 5.8 MPH (9.3 KM/H); perform bomb disposal, surveillance and reconnaissance; and detect hazardous materials.

Smith, a Marine, looked around the trade show floor.

"I would say that this room is probably filled with the world’s best in class warriors, yes."

Simpler Rifle

Gabriele de Plano of gunmaker Beretta showed off a new rifle,

that a soldier doesn’t have to carry around a ton of batteries for the rifle’s components.

"Overall, we’re simplifying the system; we’re adding capabilities with what the soldier can do with his assault rifle," de Plano said.

The rifle’s components run on six AA batteries

Spidey Sense

Jeffry Pietersz of the Netherlands-based TAGS-Systems not only sells things that will help soldiers rappel up and down buildings but

is also a little like Spiderman himself.

"When a special forces team wants to enter a ship, they use one of our compact launchers to shoot a grapnel and hook onto a ship with a rope attached," Pieterz explained, tugging on a device and a rope attached high into the convention center rafters. "And if they want to climb the ship, they can use one of our power ascenders to assault it. This is a battery-powered ascender — it has an exchangeable battery, and it has a lifting capacity of 150 kilograms. Optimized for a fully equipped operator. It will hoist yourself up 60 meters per minute."

With that, he zipped into the air.

 

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