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MRPC Weekend NEWS

IDPA this weekend Saturday April 22 !

We will have 5 stages inspired by the NRA TPC match

held at the range last weekend !

 

Round count is 150 but bring extra.

 

New shooter orientation and sign-ups are at 0830,

Match begins at 0900

at the RVSSA Law Enforcement Range

Jackson County Sports Park, White City.

 

See you there !

Leif Johnson   

medfordlender@gmail.com     541-890-1195

 

The Medford Rifle and Pistol Club—Shoot Safely

 

Klamath Practical Shooting

 

There will be a match on Sunday, April 23rd

Starts at 9am, Come early to Sign-In


We will shoot the four stages that

I planned for last month.
Should be good weather

Aloha
Jon

 

For more Information, use

mck508@charter.net

 

The Medford Rifle and Pistol Club—Shoot Safely

 

 

Monthly Meeting Update

At the MRPC General Meeting Wednesday Night

 

Guy Antinarelli presented the Club Improvement Projects for 2017.

First Approval vote was granted for upgrading the ventilation system

in the indoor range, installing a new French Drain from the west side of

the indoor range to the water course along the east side of the property, and

to upgrade the old plumbing in the Men’s Restrooms.

A Second Approval vote on the Ventilation Project will be held at next month’s meeting.

Total Project Expenditures for 2017 are estimated at $36,000

 

 

The Medford Rifle and Pistol Club—Shoot Safely

 

 

Skill Set: Empty Reload

There are many names for it, but I call it the "empty reload." You’re firing the pistol and it runs empty. The slide locks back on the empty mag. Getting the pistol reloaded efficiently is critical. This is the first of the "Functional Manipulations."

For Functional Manipulations, the techniques required to keep the pistol running, I teach keeping the pistol on target. This cuts out wasted motion. Lowering the pistol down, or bringing it in closer to the body, means once it’s reloaded you have to get it back on target to fire. This movement consumes time. (There are situations where you would need to bring the pistol in close, for example to reload while running, or to get the muzzle up so you don’t cover members of your team. For general self-defense it’s better to keep it on target.) Taking the pistol off target shows the threat your pistol is out of the fight. They may try to take advantage of this. Holding the pistol on target also lets you maintain visual contact with the threat, which is likely to be moving.

Step One: Finger off the trigger. No manipulations without first taking the finger off the trigger and getting it clear of the trigger guard.

Old mag out. To release the empty mag out you’ll probably need to reposition the pistol in your hand to press the mag release. It’s probably not a bad idea to strip the mag out with the support hand at the same time, especially considering you might have to reload with your body in a strange position where gravity doesn’t pull the empty mag down. Once the empty mag is clear reacquire your firing grip with the strong hand.

The support hand acquires the fresh magazine, positioning it properly in the hand. Index it, align and seat it into the magwell aggressively. Remember the key with all these skills is consistency, and all these actions are based on the same techniques for the Administrative Manipulations.

Now it’s time to chamber a round. We teach cycling the slide to load, as opposed to using the "slide lock" as a release. There are several reasons for this. First, this is the way the pistols are designed to function. The slide is locked to the rear, but when you pull back it will come rearward another quarter inch or so. This ensures full spring pressure to feed and seat the fresh round. This is also the same technique used with the slide for all other manipulations. Some pistols don’t have external slide locks; cycling the slide is the only way they will work. Keep in mind, there’s no Golden Rule that says you’ll always have your handgun. We want one set of skills that will work for all semi-auto pistols.

Reacquire your grip with the support hand. The sights should still be on target, or close, with minimal movement required to fire again if necessary.

If the situation does require you to fire slow down and get an accurate hit. One issue we see with shooters is that they’ll try to go too fast, attempting to make up for "lost" time. There’s no "catch-up," except the kind you put on food. Once the pistol is running again, take the time necessary to score an accurate shot.

Reloading efficiently requires practice. The best way to practice is dry fire, using dummy ammunition to work the reload over and over. Once it’s feeling good, practice with your eyes closed so you can reload without having or needing to see the pistol. Next, work on reloading from various positions such as lying on the ground.

You never know what the fight will look like. With a high capacity pistol your chances of having to perform an empty reload are slim. But, we know it’s a possibility so we practice in order to be prepared.

Tiger McKee is director of Shootrite Firearms Academy, located in northern Alabama. He is the author of "The Book of Two Guns" – http://shootrite.org/book/book.html writes for several firearms/tactical publications, and is featured on GunTalk’s DVD, "Fighting With The 1911 – http://shootrite.org/dvd/dvd.html McKee’s new book, AR-15 Skills and Drills, is available off Shootrite’s website: http://shootrite.org/AR15SkillsBook/AR15SkillsBook.html

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Shootrite-Firearms-Academy/156608611038230?ref=ts

 

 

 

The Medford Rifle and Pistol Club—Shoot Safely

 

 

From: The Oregon Firearm Federation

Legislative Alerts

 

One Bad Bill Dead, One Really Bad Bill Moving.

04.18.17

Today in the legislature one anti-gun bill died and one was advanced out of committee.

House Bill 2526, a bill sponsored by anti-gun Democrat Senator Elizabeth Hayward and Republican Knute Buehler, was declared deceased in the House Judiciary Committee.

This bill would have required the Department of Justice to create material on suicides and forced gun dealers to distribute this material with gun purchases.  The chair of the committee, House Rep Jeff Barker, wisely let this bill expire. Thank you Representative Barker.

 

Tonight in the Senate Judiciary Committee the Democrats passed SB 719 to the Senate floor over the objections of Republicans Kim Thatcher and Dennis Linthicum. This bill is the work of anti-gun zealot Ginny Burdick and Republican Brian Boquist.

This bill will require that local police come to your home and confiscate your firearms if a family member tells a judge that they think you are dangerous or suicidal. It also allows any police officer to make the same accusations about you to a judge. The police officer does not need to know you or even have ever met you.

You are not allowed to contest the confiscation order until after your rights and property have been taken.

Under this bill you can have your gun rights stolen and your property confiscated if you have purchased a firearm or ammunition in the last 180 days.  That is not a misprint or a joke. A “household” member or police officer can request that your gun rights be eliminated and your guns confiscated by police…because you bought a gun.

While we think there will be more efforts to destroy your gun rights, SB 719 is the immediate danger.

If you have never taken action before, this is the time to do it. This is one of the most dangerous and deceitful bills the Democrats have ever tried to ram through the legislature. (Well, the Democrats and Republican Brian Boquist.)

Please contact the members of the Oregon Senate and urge them to vote “no” on this extreme violation of rights and common sense.

For More Information on How to Contact the Oregon Senate, use the following link

http://www.oregonfirearms.org/one-bad-bill-dead-one-really-bad-bill-moving

 

The Medford Rifle and Pistol Club—Shoot Safely

 

This information is provided to our members solely as a service.

The opinions expressed are not the official position of MRPC, its Board, Officers or Directors.

Each member is encouraged to conduct their own study of these matters.

 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC NEWS

April General Meeting

Wednesday 7pm at Indoor Range

Topics: Range Officer Training and Ventilation Improvements

 

 

Fullbore Rifle Practice

Weather Permitting

We will shoot on Wednesday 19th at 4pm at the Camp White Rifle Range.

600yds prone or bench, 22 rounds or less. Frank 541 899 6872

 

 

 

 

 

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MRPC Legislative Issues Update, presented by OFF

 

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Oregon’s Only No Compromise Gun Rights Organization

 

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04.14.17

As we have told you, the Senate Judiciary Committee will be hearing three anti-gun bills on Monday morning. While we were able to warn you about the dangers of SB 797 and SB 868 in previous alerts, we did not know until today what to expect from SB 764. Now we do.
 

SB 764 has morphed from a one paragraph bogus "place holder" bill to a 30 page monstrosity with one goal, to make concealed handgun licenses impossible to get.
 

Under the amended SB 764, concealed handgun classes would not only require live fire (something becoming more difficult every day as our ranges disappear due to lawsuits) but it would also forbid online training (something even the Oregon Sheriffs Association offers) and require that the class include "training in the safe loading, unloading, storage and carrying of handguns and training in the current laws governing the lawful use of a firearm, including self-defense, the use of force, including deadly force, and the transportation and concealment of handguns."
 

So, in addition to needing a range, you will need an instructor who is a legal expert. The problem is, of course, NRA instructors are firearms instructors. They get no training in the laws of different states by the NRA and, in fact, are discouraged from teaching the law in their classes. So who will provide "legal" training for these classes, who will certify them and who will determine the curriculum?
 

Rest assured, even if you can find an instructor who can meet all these requirements, the cost of a CHL class will skyrocket and the number of places and instructors that can provide this (as of yet undefined) service will dwindle to almost zero.
 

Make no mistake, this bill has one goal; to eliminate concealed carry and pay off anti-gun New York billionaires who are bankrolling anti-gun legislators.
 

SB 868, which was created to allow a court to take away your firearms based on allegations from household members or police, now has amendments to expand it to allow a court to take away "Any instrument, article or substance specifically designed for and presently capable of causing death or serious physical injury." 
 

When you think about it, that could be anything. The new amended version also allows you to have your possessions seized because you were convicted of a DUI and allows the police to search your home to find and seize anything they want to call a "deadly weapon."
 

Please consider coming to the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Monday at 8AM in Hearing Room 50 and express your outrage at this attempt to disarm Oregonians.
 

And please contact the members of the Senate Judiciary Committee to voice your opposition to this transparent attack on your rights to self defense.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

 

If you prefer you can also send your testimony to the committee to be entered into the record. The address for testimony is:  sjud.exhibits@oregonlegislature.gov


A sample message and legislator’s contact info follow.

You can also use the automailer in the web version of this email to contact all of the committee members at one time. 

 

Dear Senator,

SB 764 is clearly nothing more than an effort to eliminate lawful concealed carry in Oregon. The requirements proposed in the "dash-2" amendments are onerous, unnecessary and almost impossible to comply with. 

I strongly urge you to consider your constituents and not the deep pockets of New York billionaires who are promoting this harmful legislation and vote "NO" on the amended SB 764.
 

SB 868 is an outrageous assault on liberty, private property and due process. As amended by the "dash 1" amendments it is far worse.

Vote "NO" on SB 868 and the "dash-1"amendments.

 

 

 

Senate Judiciary Committee


Senator Floyd Prozanski  
Sen.FloydProzanski@OregonLegislature.gov   

503-986-1704 
 

Senator Kim Thatcher 
Sen.KimThatcher@state.or.us   

503-986-1713
 

Senator Michael Dembrow 
Sen.MichaelDembrow@state.or.us  
503-986-1723  
 

Senator Dennis Linthicum  
sen.DennisLinthicum@oregonlegislature.gov 
503-986-1728
 

Senator James Manning  
Sen.JamesManning@oregonlegislature.gov   
503-986-1707

 

 

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Oregon Firearms Federation, Box 556, Canby, OR 97013

 

 

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This information is provided to our members solely as a service. 

The opinions expressed are not the official position of MRPC, its Board, Officers or Directors. 

Each member is encouraged to conduct their own study of these matters.

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MRPC Late Breaking News—-Tonight’s Practical Pistol Practice is CANCELLED

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC        News

MRPC News

THE APRIL USPSA MATCH

SCHEDULED FOR THIS WEEKEND

HAS BEEN CANCELLED

 

Be Safe    Be Safe   Have Fun    Have Fun

OREGON Concealed Carry Weapons Course

 

COST: $25.00

(A typical savings of $50 over the regular $75 price at other places)

 

This class offers far more than the minimum training offered at other places

It is held at the MRPC Indoor Range

Live-Fire Range Time included in the Class

This Saturday

Remember that using a firearm for self-defense can have serious consequences.

Making a wrong decision can thrust you into the criminal court system and/or result in a civil lawsuit.

This is why you want to take a comprehensive class that offers you the best training available.

 

More information available under the “Training” tab of the club’s website  www.mrpc.info

TO RESERVE YOUR PLACE IN A CCW CLASSES:

Directly E-mail Phil at PhilGrammatica@yahoo.com

 

Be Safe    Be Safe   Have Fun    Have Fun

 

Klamath Action Steel

Bill Watson <ogrebro@gmail.com>

 

Saturday will be this month’s Action Steel match at the Klamath Sportsman’s park in Keno!!

If the weather still looks good we will be shooting out on the bays!

 

There will be 5 stages, registration is at 9:00 with shooting to start at 9:30.

Please come early to help with setup if you can.

 

See ya Saturday!!!

Bill & Larry Watson

 

Be Safe    Be Safe   Have Fun    Have Fun

 

You Can’t Fix Stupid…


By now you have probably seen the video from the Tulsa gun show where the security guard (wearing a POLICE shirt) negligently fires a round and hits another officer. If not, watch it first.  I’ll wait …  
See link below

So, what do we see? What can we learn? How many of the Four Rules Of Gun Safety did he violate? All of them. Here’s a quick takeaway. You’ve heard me say this before, and it may not have clicked with you, so I’ll repeat it, and explain it. When you are unloading a semi-auto pistol, rack the slide THREE TIMES. Why? Well, if loaded rounds keep flying out of the pistol as you rack the slide, that’s what we call a clue. There is ammunition in the magazine and you are putting a loaded round into the chamber! Think of the Tony Orlando song, and RACK THREE TIMES. (Younger readers will need to search YouTube.) ~ Tom Gresham
https://www.readfrontier.org/stories/warrant-issued-arrest-man-involved-gun-show-shooting2/

 

Be Safe    Be Safe   Have Fun    Have Fun

 

Precision Pistol: Iron Sights in the Sun

by Norman Wong, O.D. – Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Precision Pistol: Iron Sights in the Sun

 

While most ranges have covered firing points that provide shade for competitors, Camp Perry and the “warm-up” regional matches at Canton, OH, do not. If you’re confused about your visual perception of iron sights under the open sun, this article addresses those concerns and shares lessons learned from some of the finest precision (bullseye) pistol shooters in the country.

Our panel included national champions, national record holders, Olympic-caliber shooters and shooters who are on top of their game. All are high masters (except for two masters) and are also Distinguished.

Question: Do your shot groupings change when shooting under the open sun?

Don Nygord was a member of the U.S. shooting team for over 20 years and wrote extensively during 1998-2003. Many of his articles can be found at this link: www.australiancynic.com/NYGORD.htm. Nygord’s notes indicate that if the sun is shining from the right, then the front sight blade will be “blurred” on the right side. This will cause the right side to appear thinner, and the apparent gap between the rear sight notch and front blade will be wider. When the sights are realigned, errant shots will go to the right.

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Light and shadow can cause optical illusions that may move the apparent aiming point.

Response overview

Surprisingly, two distinct schools of thought emerged from the survey. There were a total of seventeen responders. Eight responders reported never needing to change their sights for windage due to sunlight. We’ll call them group 1. Eight others (group 2) reported that they did routinely change sights for windage as a result of bright sunlight. The 17th shooter was not sure.

Those in group 2 who adjusted their sights to the prevailing light conditions typically moved their rear sight windage by 1 to 3 clicks. Four of this group used up to five clicks under more extreme conditions. Nobody from group 1 saw the blurred front sight edge mentioned in Nygord’s notes. One from this group commented: “I know that the sunlight directionality can affect the perceived appearance of the BULL and thus cause one to compensate with the iron sights in just the OPPOSITE way of your example … light on the right will cause you to shoot left.” From group 2, only two responders noted a blurred front edge on the same side as the sun, while another from this group saw a blurred front sight, but on the “opposite” side of the sun.

Apertures at the National Matches

None in group 1 used an aperture. Of the eight in group 2, four used an aperture, while three did not. One used it sometimes.

Sight black

The carbide type was most prevalently used by both groups. Shooters from group 1 used either carbide or aerosol sight black. Six from group 2 used carbide, while one used aerosol, and another sometimes used either type. Brian Zins wrote, “A cigar lighter is great.”

Here are some responses from group 1 (no change in windage due to shifting sun):

Jim Lenardson: (Last shooter to win the National matches with iron sights.) I shot iron sights for 30 years as a high master. I shot 2670 several times with them and never had the sights change with the sun. I am well aware of folks talking about that, but I never had a problem with it. It always came up at Perry because of facing the North and no over-head cover. Some were adamant about it and others thought it made no difference.

Brian Zins: The biggest thing I notice when shooting irons outdoors is the sunlight’s effect on elevation more than anything. I feel it is due to the sun on the target more than on the sights. The rifle shooting phrase “lights up, sights up” is kind of the same effect that Don Nygord talks about concerning the front sight.

https://assets.ssusa.org/media/1535900/wongweb1.jpg

Only a few of those surveyed shoot with an aperture, intended to improve depth of field.

Steve Reiter: This is strictly my opinion from shooting a lot of years with iron sights. I disagree with Nygord. The sun’s effect is really more apparent in rifle shooting. With the rifle, it has nothing to do with the sights, because you blacken the sights to prevent that. What the light does affect is the black circle you are putting your sights against. By this I mean it will make the black appear bigger or smaller, which does affect sight picture and bullet impact. Left or right impact is probably going to be the left or right side of the 10-ring, depending on the range you are shooting and the angle of the sun.

Dave Lange: I very rarely have to make sight corrections. I have heard the comments at Perry about how the sun changed between the President’s 100 match and the NTI and NTT matches. I have never noticed this in my sights.

John Bickar: (As a multinational junior champion, Bickar shoots iron sights exclusively.) I’ve heard the “lights right, sights right” adage but have not found it definitively to be the case.

Chris Johnson: I have not noticed shot groupings move with light conditions. Specifically, shooting ball at Camp Perry at 7:00 am then again at 11:00 am does not move my groupings.

Here are some responses from group 2 (windage changed due to shifting sun):

Philip Hemphill: (10-time National Police Shooting Champion and 2-time National Precision Pistol Champion) My eye doctor here in Mississippi gets a little uneasy when I bring my guns into his office for sight picture correction, but I have found that is the only way I can get a correct adjustment for vision. I have been shooting iron sights in police matches for decades and have found that the glare on the front sight has more bearing on shot placement than the effect of the sun. Our range faces north, while the range at Jackson Police Department (PD) faces south. I have to move 2 clicks left and 1 click down when I shoot at the Jackson PD. The sun was on my left side over there. The sun has a tendency to push me away from the target.

John Zurek: I often shoot iron sights while training with the Free Pistol. Here in Phoenix, our club is situated so that I am shooting south. When I start a training session, normally I have rounds going down range by 8:00 a.m., when the sun is coming up on my left. In that light, my grouping is to the left. As the sun centers overhead, my grouping is centered. When I train in the afternoon, my group moves to the right. (I’m shooting for groups in these sessions, rather than adjusting the sights.) My theory has been that the sun shines on that part of the front sight (left or right) causing a graying effect, which makes the mind move the sights in that direction to make up for the apparent gap.

I also note that bright light shining on the target gives the appearance of an elongated bullseye, opposite from the sun (sun’s up, sights up). When one is focused on the sights, the “black thing” downrange is blurred to the left or right, due to the sun’s position.

https://assets.ssusa.org/media/1535901/wongweb2.jpg

Half of those surveyed shoot with a center-of-mass sight picture. The rest shoot with a 6 o’clock aiming point.

Steve Locatelli (SLO CAT): The only places I shoot service pistol in direct sunlight are at the Canton Regional, the NRA Whittington Center and at Camp Perry. I do notice that the groups tend to move towards the direction of the sunlight. It is more noticeable to me at 50 yards than at 25 yards. My take on the reason this happens is that my eye is trying to center the front sight in the rear sight notch and, in doing this, I unconsciously move the front sight toward the bright side to even out the perceived light on both sides of the sight blade. I have not noticed an elevation change when the sun is directly overhead, but I will always adjust my sights to correct an errant group, even if I don’t know why the group is errant. I do not notice that the bright side of the front sight is “blurred.”

At Camp Perry, the President’s 100 match usually starts at 0700 hours with the sun low on our right side. I adjust two clicks left. During the NTI later in the morning, I take out these two clicks. In the afternoon team matches, I adjust two clicks to the right, as long as there is still direct sunlight. Overcast conditions usually are the same for me as shooting from a covered firing line.

Col. Joe Chang: My iron sights always have been different than other shooters. When I pick up someone else’s ball gun, I wind up shooting high into the 8-ring. I use a serrated front sight and sometimes I do see the front sight being more gray than black. This may be due to reflections from the front sight which might distort the way I see it. Rather than over-analyze it, I adjust my sights to center my group.

Summary

I wish to thank everyone for their replies and sharing their expertise. With no disrespect to others who have different viewpoints, this was how our shooters saw their sight picture. Of interest, the six national champions all belong to group 1 and saw their front sights with no edge blur; no report of edge glare; all used either a black or white occluder (one shuts the eye), and none used an aperture.

As an optometrist reviewing these responses, there were no conclusions I could offer from the use of plus add power lenses, tints, anti-reflection coatings or apertures. Peoples’ perceptions vary. In general, my recommendation has always been to obtain the best focus for the front sight, followed by the rear sight and then the bull. How “blurred” is considered acceptable can be shown by your eye care professional.

 

Be Safe    Be Safe   Have Fun    Have Fun

PATRICK KELLEY—3-GUN TRAINING TIPS

Competition shooter Patrick Kelley’s three-step plan to sharpen your modern sporting rifle and 3-gun skills.

 

Practice is a surefire way to sharpen your shooting skills, whether you’re gunning for increased speed and accuracy with a modern sporting rifle or looking to improve your game in 3-gun competition. Since most shooters don’t enjoy the luxury of unlimited ammunition and range time, however, efficient prep and practice are keys to making it happen.

Competitive shooter Patrick Kelley is a firm believer in the concept. “Anyone can buy an accurate rifle,” he says. “What makes someone a really good shooter is becoming intimately familiar with every aspect of that firearm’s operation, and practicing with it as much as possible.”

He also knows the real world often sets limits on practice time. “People think competitive shooters are all sponsored because we like to wear jerseys and look professional,” he says. “But the truth is, almost everyone has a full-time job and is trying to balance work and family with their passion for shooting. They’re trying to squeeze in enough practice time to shoot proficiently when a match is on the line.”

To help shooters hone their form in a hurry, Kelley offers a three-step plan for high-efficiency practice. While he focuses on the competitive side of the MSR scene, his advice holds water for hunters and plinkers as well.

1. Familiarity Breeds Success
Step one is getting a feel for your firearms. “Handling your guns at home is a great way to become familiar with how they feel and work, so you’re not fumbling around at the range,” he says. “It’s also a whole lot easier to find time to work with guns at home than it is to make extra trips to the range and familiarize yourself with them there.”

Kelley’s personal gun-handling regimen begins well in advance of competitions. In fact, it truly never ends. “I handle my guns during the off-season, but this increases dramatically during my train-up before the season starts,” he explains.

http://www.federalpremium.com/premium_moments/images/moments/PremMoments_Kelley_930x624-1.jpg

Gun-handling practice includes shouldering long guns and establishing a proper cheek weld, aiming, dry firing, loading and unloading the shotgun (with inert “dummy” shells) and magazine changes with the rifle and handgun. Handguns are drawn from the holster and retrieved from table tops and presented to the target. “I want to be as comfortable as possible with the gun before getting into live-fire practice and competitive situations,” he adds.

If you’re new to the sport, Kelley advises watching videos that offer instruction, as well as those featuring actual shooting competitions.

“Devote plenty of time to mounting the gun, dry firing, safely abandoning it and picking up another gun.” 

“If you’re interested in 3-gun matches, pay attention to the different steps involved in competition and work these into your gun-handling practice,” he says. “For example, making fast and smooth transitions between different guns is a huge factor, so devote plenty of time to mounting the gun, dry firing, safely abandoning it and picking up another gun.” 

Of course, even veteran shooters benefit from such exercises. “All these steps are critical to prepare you for the moment when the range officer asks, ‘Are you Ready?’” 

2. Find Your Zero
Kelley is also a staunch advocate of zeroing every gun in his battery. “If I’m shooting a 3-gun competition, the rifle, pistol and shotgun are all zeroed in,” he says. “This gives me the confidence to make any shot, as I know where my guns shoot relative to the sight system at any distance.”

As many shooters know, zeroing a firearm is the art of setting its sights so the bullet or slug hits where you’re aiming at a given range.

“The actual zero distance is a personal matter,” Kelley notes. “With a scoped MSR, for example, I like to zero so that one of my scope’s stadia lines is on at 300 yards for example, then I work backward taking note of impacts relative to the rest of the scope’s reticle.”

3. Steel Yourself
When these fundamentals are accomplished and you’re finally ready for some serious range time, Kelley advises a paperless program.

“I rarely shoot paper targets at the range other than to establish my zeros,” he says. “Steel is the deal for efficient training. It makes short work of practice, because there’s no wasted time checking to see if you hit the target or having to tape it up. Steel gives immediate feedback. Either you hit it or you didn’t. If you feel the need to check your groups—which should have been part of the zeroing process—you can always paint a steel target.”

Kelley favors heavy-duty steel targets that deflect splashback and are the same shape of a paper target, only smaller, and designed for use with rifles, pistols and shotguns.

http://www.federalpremium.com/premium_moments/images/moments/PremMoments_Kelley_930x620-2.jpg

When peppering steel, he rotates guns and shooting positions to mimic situations he might face in competition. “Practice in all possible field positions that a particular range has available,” he says. “If all you have is a bench, use it, but don’t just sit down and shoot. Kneel and shoot over the bench while supporting the rifle with your elbows. Also shoot some from the prone position using your magazine as a monopod for increased stability.”

“The very best shooters in any sport still work on the fundamentals of marksmanship, as it is the foundation of all good shooting.”

Through it all, Kelley recommends mastering the fundamentals first, before getting too creative. “People want to run before they can walk,” he laughs. “The very best shooters in any sport still work on the fundamentals of marksmanship, as it is the foundation of all good shooting. Once you have that down, all you have to do is apply them to whatever situation you encounter in the field or competition.”

 

Be Safe    Be Safe   Have Fun    Have Fun

 

 

 

http://r3.ien.com/files/base/indm/ien/image/2017/04/16x9/640w/Ammunition_Plant_Expl_Well.58ee28510cdb5.jpg

This photo from video by KCTV5 shows damage to the side of a building in the aftermath of a fatal explosion at the Lake City Army Ammunition Plant in Independence, Mo., Tuesday, April 11, 2017.

KCTV5 via AP

Safety Apr 12, 2017   Share

Explosion at Ammunition Plant Kills 1, Injures 4

Other explosions have occurred at the Midwestern plant, including a 1990 blast that killed one worker and a 1981 explosion that severely burned a worker who later died.

Author: Jim Suhr, Margaret Stafford

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — An explosion Tuesday at a sprawling ammunition plant near Kansas City, Missouri, killed one worker and injured four others, the U.S. Army said.

The blast at the Lake City Army Ammunition Plant in Independence, just east of Kansas City, occurred in a building where chemicals are mixed, Army officials. The building has been secured and rendered safe, they said, allowing investigators to begin looking into what caused the explosion.

Other explosions have occurred at the plant, including a 1990 blast that killed one worker and a 1981 explosion that severely burned a worker who later died, according to records. In 2011, six people were injured in a blast there.

The plant has been fined for workplace safety issues at least three times.

All the plant’s nearly 1,800 employees were sent home after Tuesday’s explosion and told to call in before returning to work Wednesday. The four injured workers were evaluated at the scene and declined additional treatment, officials said.

Lt. Col. Eric B. Dennis, the plant’s commander, offered his condolences to family members of the worker who died.

"Making ammunition is dangerous work and our employees risk their lives to protect the men and women in uniform," Dennis said. "This is the sacrifice they make to support our country and I am humbled by the ultimate sacrifice this employee made today."

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives will lead the investigation. Workplace safety experts with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration also will be looking into the blast.

The 77-year-old plant, created to help arm the U.S. military effort in the run-up to World War II, makes small-caliber ammunition and tests its reliability. The factory also operates the NATO test center.

The plant, which sits on nearly 4,000 acres and is the first of a dozen Army small-arms factories, has undergone hundreds of millions of dollars in upgrades since the mid-2000s. The property has more than 400 buildings and nine warehouses, and has a storage capacity of more than 700,000 square feet.

The factory has a governmental staff payroll of $2.9 million and a workforce that includes 29 Department of Army civilians and a soldier to provide contract oversight.

Dulles, Virginia-based contractor Orbital ATK, the biggest maker of small-caliber ammunition for the U.S. Department of Defense, runs the plant. Since 2000, Orbital has produced more than 17 billion rounds of small-caliber ammunition at Lake City for military purposes.

Jim Nickels, vice president and general manager of Orbital ATK, said the explosion happened in a building where workers mix chemicals into the primer that goes into all small-caliber munitions.

Orbital announced Monday that it has received a $92 million order from the Army for 5.56 mm and 7.62 mm ammunition, adding that Orbital and the Army "have made significant upgrades at the facility in recent years that have enhanced product quality; and performance, efficiency and operational improvements for safety and environmental stewardship."

Orbital has roughly 12,500 employees in 18 states and in several international locations.

When the 2011 explosion occurred at the plant, injuring six people, Alliant Techsystems, or ATK, was the contractor operating the facility. OSHA fined the plant for workplace safety issues that year and also in 2008 and 2012.

The largest penalty was in 2011 when Alliant was initially fined $28,000. It paid $5,600. OSHA had cited it for "serious" issues with process safety management of hazardous chemicals.

 

Be Safe    Be Safe   Have Fun    Have Fun

 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC NEWS

 

Wednesday FULLBORE RIFLE Practice

There is a 80 to 90 percent chance of rain late on Wednesday afternoon.

We will not shoot this Wednesday.

See you next week. Frank 541 899 6872

 

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

 

APRIL   STEEL CHALLENGE RESULTS

4-9-2017      39 Shooters

 

DIVISION                             FIRST PLACE       SECOND PLACE

CF Pistol Limited               A. Neuman         S. Hall

CF Pistol Open                   B. Andrews         E. Boening

PCC Open                            R. Isner                 L. LaBrocca

Revolver Limited              L. Johnson           J. Johnson

RImfire Pistol Open         D. Enloe               J. Schreiner

Rimfire Rifle Limited       T. Brand               B. Young

Rimfire Rifle Open           T. Flowers           D. Gettling

 

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

 

Oregon Firearms Federation

<off@oregonfirearms.org>

Anti-Gun Bills Moving in Both Houses

Oregon Firearms Federation, Box 556, Canby, OR 97013

 

Click on the LINKS to read actual legislative Bill

 

Logo

Oregon’s Only No Compromise Gun Rights Organization

 

 

 

04.08.17

As we told you in our last alert, anti-gun bills are about to get hearings.

First, on Wednesday, April 12, the Senate Judiciary Committee will be hearing a strange bill requested by a former Senator. 

"Creates crime of militia terrorism." 

This  bill was introduced at the request of  former anti-gun legislator, Charlie Ringo, and is clearly a reaction to the Malhuer occupation. But it serves little purpose but to stigmatize the term "militia" and open the door for prosecutions of people who have actually complied with law enforcement orders to leave a "publicly owned premises". It’s one more attempt to demonize the mere possession of a firearm, serves no public benefit and deserves to be shuffled off to the garbage heap.

But the real action comes on April 17, when both the House and Senate Judiciary Committees have scheduled numerous anti-gun bills for hearings.

Just so you know, these hearings have been scheduled and designed to limit public input as much as possible.

Both committees are limiting testimony to two minutes. It appears the Senate committee is limiting testimony to two minutes for all bills being heard. That means if you testify, you get a total of two minutes to express your feelings about all three bills on the schedule. That’s 40 seconds a bill and that is no accident.

Rest assured the anti-gun folks will be given a lot of leeway when they testify.

The bills being heard in the Senate Judiciary Committee at 8 AM in Hearing Room 50 are:

This bill "Directs Department of State Police to study reasons for certain denials of concealed handgun license applications and report results to interim committees of Legislative Assembly related to judiciary on or before February 1, 2019."

However, unpublished amendments will change this bill drastically . We don’t know what the proposed changes will be yet but when they are made public you can see them here.  Because the "relating clause" says "relating to firearms" This bill can be turned into anything.

This is the bill we told you about in our last alert. It allows the Oregon State Police to deny a gun purchase to anyone for as long as they want. There are no safeguards for people who are delayed in error, which is 95% of people delayed. We strongly oppose this dangerous bill.

This bill allows a family member or police officer to petition a court to remove any firearm you own with no arrest for, or conviction of, a crime.  While it purports to be about removing firearms from the hands of "dangerous" people, it considers you "dangerous" if you have purchased or acquired a firearm or ammunition in the last 180 days.  We strongly oppose this dangerous bill.

 Over on the House side the Judiciary Committee will also be hearing gun bills. They will be heard at 1PM also in Room 50 in the Capitol basement. Those bills are:

This resolution "Proposes amendment to Oregon Constitution providing that law authorizing police officer to ask person if person is in possession of firearm is not law violating right of people against unreasonable search or seizure."  Currently, due to an Oregon Supreme Court decision, police, under most circumstances, are not allowed to ask a person if he possesses a firearm. This resolution, which would require a vote of the people, would eliminate that rule. While we support the intention, the resolution is overly broad and even with a proposed amendment that limits the police powers, goes way too far, allowing a police officer to stop anyone and ask them if they have a firearm. Without further amending we oppose this legislation.

This bill, the product of a Republican (Knute Buehler) and a rabidly anti-gun Democrat (Elizabeth Hayward) "Directs Department of Justice to establish firearm safety and suicide prevention education program, to create or approve educational materials and to provide educational materials to gun dealers." It also says "Multiple versions of materials must be created or approved, to reflect the different local values and cultures within this state."  Once again, an attempt to demonize firearms as if they were the only means by which a person could commit suicide. The reality is, far more people are harmed by prescription drugs. Both sponsors are doctors. Why are they not addressing the damage done by the drugs they are allowed to prescribe?  We strongly oppose this bill.

This bill "Authorizes state agency employee who is licensed to carry concealed handgun to store personal handgun and ammunition in locked container in vehicle while employee is at work and vehicle is parked in state agency parking lot."

If this bill is not saddled with dangerous amendments we support it.

Please contact the Senate Judiciary Committee and urge them to vote "no" on Senate Bills 897,797 and 868.

Please contact the House Judiciary Committee and urge them to vote "no" on House Resolution 13 and House Bill 2526.

We will keep you informed on any changes made to SB 764 and HB 3281.

Thank you for your activism.

 

 

 

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

 

 

This information is provided to our members solely as a service.  The opinions expressed are not the official position of MRPC, its Board, Officers or Directors.  Each member is encouraged to conduct their own study of these matters.

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC   NEWS

MRPC NEWS

FUN on this Pear Blossom Weekend

Steel Challenge

Not affiliated with Medford’s Pear  Blossom Festival

 

This Sunday April 9th at 9am

Come early to sign in and help set up

 

Fee $15, includes Range Fee

 

Minimum 125 Shoots—5 targets shot 5 times on 5 stages

That is… if you can hit them the first time      Bring more ammo  

 

Held at the Competition and Reserve Pistol Ranges of the Jackson County Sports Park

South off the corner of Kershaw and Corey Road, and past the public ranges.

 

Do not pay your Range Fee at the Public Range Entrance.  Just tell them

your there for the MRPC STEEL MATCH

 

 

Remember Shooting should be safe and fun….MRPC

 

 

NOT AN OBITUARY ! 

MRPC Looses A Valuable Member

but we knew it would happen !

Aeron Maier has moved to Boise

A long time member, instructor, project starter, all around great fellow

has sold his house and is moving to Idaho.   We will miss his dedication

to our club.

 

 

Remember Shooting should be safe and fun….MRPC

 

 

FULLBORE VARMINT MATCH

                   A SUCCESS

 

17 Rifle Shooters Competed in the April 2nd Varmint Match

 

First place in the Open Rifle Class went to Regina Hoffman,

Second Place to Norm Owens, and  Third Place was Wayne Douma 

 

First Place in the Hunter Rifle Class went to Dan Phariss.

 

 

Remember Shooting should be safe and fun….MRPC

 

 

ARAPROSDOKIANS…

(Winston Churchill loved them) are figures of speech in which the latter part of a sentence or phrase

                is surprising or unexpected; frequently humorous.

1. Where there’s a will, I want to be in it.
2. The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.

3. Since light travels faster than sound, some people appear bright until you hear them speak.

4. If I agreed with you, we’d both be wrong.

5. We never really grow up, we only learn how to act in public.

 

6. War does not determine who is right – only who is left.

7. Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

8. They begin the evening news with ‘Good Evening,’ then proceed to tell you why it isn’t.

9. To steal ideas from one person is plagiarism. To steal from many is research.

10. Buses stop in bus stations. Trains stop in train stations. On my desk is a work station.

 

11. I thought I wanted a career. Turns out I just wanted paychecks.

 12. In filling out an application, where it says, ‘In case of emergency, notify:’ I put ‘DOCTOR.’

 13. I didn’t say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

 14. Women will never be equal to men until they can walk down the street with a bald head and a beer gut, and still think they are sexy.

15. Behind every successful man is his woman. Behind the fall of a successful man is usually another woman.

 

16. A clear conscience is the sign of a fuzzy memory.

17. You do not need a parachute to skydive. You only need a parachute to skydive twice.

18. Money can’t buy happiness, but it sure makes misery easier to live with.

19. There’s a fine line between cuddling and holding someone down so they can’t get away.

20. I used to be indecisive. Now I’m not so sure.

 

21. You’re never too old to learn something stupid.

22. To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target.

23. Nostalgia isn’t what it used to be.

24. Change is inevitable, except from a vending machine.

25. Going to church doesn’t make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.

26. Where there’s a will, there are relatives.

 

Finally: I’m supposed to respect my elders, but it’s getting harder and harder for me to find one now.

 

 

 

 

Remember Shooting should be safe and fun….MRPC

 

How to Break-In a Rifle Barrel

by Steve Adelmann – Thursday, March 30, 2017

How to Break-In a Rifle Barrel

I visited with big-name gun company engineers and owners of familiar premium barrel brands. Thankfully, they all suffered through my questions and looked past my Neanderthal-like understanding of metallurgy. My main focus was the process of breaking in new barrels, about which any two people will have three opinions. True to form, about the only thing they all agreed on was that some barrels break in easier than others. Fortunately, I pulled other gems of wisdom out of their comments that seem to jive with my own experiences.

Ever since I was taught to care for my sniper rifles’ barrels in the Army, I’ve taken time to provide special attention to each new barrel I shoot. The degree of effort I expend depends greatly on the type of barrel I’m using and quality of internal work that went into its finishing.

Unfortunately, off-the-shelf guns often carry whatever barrel a manufacturer decides is most cost-effective. While that tube hung on the front of your favorite long-arm may look sexy on the outside, its material, rifling style, chambering and finish all affect how much break-in is needed. While opinions on this subject vary, I think most of those involved in accuracy-specific shooting disciplines will agree that the simple "load and go" approach is not the best way to initiate a new barrel.

In the simplest terms, break-in is the process of smoothing out the rough edges and tool marks left in a barrel’s bore. Depending on manufacturing methods, a bore may be mirror-slick when you receive it, or it may be a few grits shy of 250 on the sandpaper scale. Firing projectiles through a rough barrel—which starts in the leade or free-bore section prior to rifling—leaves microscopic pieces of jacket deposited throughout the bore. The more rounds fired over the rough inner barrel, the more difficult it becomes to remove copper and powder fouling. If these deposits are not removed, you’re left with a heavily diminished potential for decent accuracy.

Talking to the gurus solidified a notion I’ve had for many years: There is no single right way to break-in a new barrel. Since manufacturing methods are out of our hands when using finished barrels, we must learn to read the signs each one provides when new. As a copper or other gilding-metal-jacketed projectile moves through a rough bore, it actually provides an element of lapping action. If this material is removed before continuing to fire, the lapping process continues until the rough surfaces are polished smooth.

The important thing to remember here is that in the first few rounds it’s critical to shoot, scrub and patch the bore and chamber clean after each round. While doing so, observe the level of copper fouling and degree of cleaning needed to remove it. In many cases, the process can be done in a few rounds, but occasionally I’ll come across a barrel that doesn’t see full break-in until 80 to 100 rounds have been through it.

I’m nowhere near patient enough to shoot one round and clean that many times. I normally use that protocol for 10 to 20 rounds before proceeding to shoot a group or two between cleanings. My progress is gauged by two critical indicators: grouping and ease of copper removal. As the bore is smoothed out groups start to tighten—often from one group to the next—and less copper is deposited. Eventually, I see my groups settle-in at about the same time the cleaning process reaches a normal level of effort. At that point, I know I can fire whatever amount of rounds is appropriate for the cartridge and barrel type between cleanings.

The methods used to clean both bore and chamber throughout the break-in process are just as important as the frequency of cleaning. I recommend using the same detailed bore-cleaning procedures you would use after a heavy range session. This should consist of using a bore brush soaked with a good solvent that will dissolve copper and carbon fouling without damaging the bore. Hoppe’s No. 9 Solvent and Shooter’s Choice MC #7 Bore Cleaner and Condi-tioner are both excellent choices for this task.

While ammonia-based solvents are generally OK when used according to their directions, it’s very important to remove all traces of ammonia before firing or storing the rifle. According to a source much smarter than me, firing with any ammonia in the bore will result in a chemical reaction that destroys it, so diligence is required when using these potent cleaners.

Regardless of solvent type, scrub well between shots, let it soak for a few minutes (the warmer the barrel the easier the copper and fouling are to remove) then push patches in one direction through the bore repeatedly until they come out clean. If you use homemade patches, don’t use colored cloth that will disguise the greenish-blue signs of copper you should be looking for. After the initial crud is removed, send a solvent-soaked patch through the barrel in one direction, let the bore soak again for a few more minutes and follow it with clean patches. If they continue to come out greenish-blue, repeat the process until they’re clean.

I’ve come across a few rough bores that require additional work in the first few rounds. If I can’t seem to get the copper out, I’ll use a mildly abrasive cleaner like J-B Non-Embedding Bore Cleaning Compound until I get the fouling out.

Some companies offer projectiles impregnated with a lapping compound intended to speed the break-in process. I can’t vouch for these products, but I have read some positive reviews of them over the years. I’m very wary of the paste compounds advertised to have miracle break-in assisting properties because I saw one such product destroy two premium .308 Win. barrels many years ago. The guilty company is still in business, but the specific product used is no longer available. The end result of successful, expedient break-in methods is the same as doing it the old fashioned shoot-and-clean way, so it’s up to you to figure out what’s best in your case.

If you have a break-in technique that works, there’s no reason to change what you’re doing. The important part is taking the time to do something more than simply firing a bunch of rounds and proclaiming the barrel broken-in. The results of spending more time and ammunition always pays off for me. Many of my custom AR clients don’t have the budget for a premium barrel, yet through careful fitting, accurizing and breaking in, I’m able to provide them with sub-MOA rifles and carbines, regardless of barrel type.

I can’t over-emphasize the importance of paying close attention to chamber cleanliness during break-in. Whenever you’re going through a cleaning cycle, use a chamber brush, solvent and patches to ensure the chamber and throat receive a thorough cleaning each time.

While most folks don’t have access to a bore scope, those who do will find it worthwhile to watch their bore throughout break-in. Not only are the tooling marks in a new barrel evident, copper fouling will stand out and tell you when there’s more cleaning to be done.

With care, a good break-in will extend the life of your new barrel while preparing it to deliver whatever level of accuracy it’s capable of. No amount of proper break-in can fix a poorly made barrel, but lack of any break-in procedures will likely limit a good barrel’s life and diminish its accuracy potential right from the start.

 

Remember Shooting should be safe and fun….MRPC

 

Skill Set: Administrative Manipulations for the Semi-Auto

This is the way to hold a loaded magazine — toe of the floor plate in the palm of your hand, thumb and fingers along the lower part of the magazine and the index finger along the front edge to guide it into the receiver.

Last week we discussed the basics of manipulating the semi-auto pistol. Now, we’re going to launch into the details, starting with the Administrative manipulations. This category includes loading, unloading or verifying the status of the pistol – is it loaded or unloaded.

The Admin manipulations are performed in a "Low-Ready" position. The hands, arms and pistol are extended out in front of the body with the muzzle pointing in a downward position. This keeps the pistol pointing in a safe direction. The Admin actions always start with the magazine and end by checking the chamber.

With these actions, and almost everything else, it’s the small details that make a big difference. Consistency is the key; all your manipulations are done the same way every time, which ensures efficiency and safety.

For example, every time you pick up a magazine it should be positioned in your hand with the first finger running up the front of the mag and actually touching the top round. This tells you the mag is loaded, and the top round isn’t sticking partially out of the mag, which prevents it from being inserted into the pistol. The thumb and fingers are down low on the mag with the base-pad or bottom of the magazine in contact with the heel of the hand.

Loading starts by "indexing" the mag. You bring the mag up at an angle – top of the mag tilting forward – and index the back of the magazine with the back of the magwell. This is a positive index that’s easy to feel, as opposed to trying to stick it straight in. After hitting this index you align the mag with the magwell and start pushing it in. At this point you open up the thumb and fingers, seating the mag aggressively using the heel of the hand.

When you’re manipulating the firearm use aggressive actions, applying more force than should be necessary to ensure positive results. Then if you’re a little distracted by the guy that’s trying to kill you and you use less force than you normally do it, will still be enough to get the job done.

Perform these actions with head and eyes up, learning how to manipulate the pistol without having to see it. This is especially important when involved in a confrontation. There are more important things to look at than your weapon. If it’s dark you won’t be able to see it anyway. The only time you should need to look at it is when visually checking the chamber.

Next, chamber a round by cycling the slide. We teach using a "C" clamp grip on the slide, clamping it between the heel of the hand and the fingers. (This is where all your gripping strength is.) Make sure your fingers or hand are not blocking or covering the ejection port, which obviously will cause problems. Cycle the slide one time, again aggressively.

You’ve gone through all the actions to load, but the last step of all Admin actions is checking the chamber. This can be a visual check – pulling the slide slightly back to see the round – or a physical check – pull the slide rearward and use a finger to physically feel for the round. Checking the chamber is cheap insurance. Now you know when you press the trigger it will go "bang."

Unloading starts with the magazine. Remove it and place it in the pinky finger of the firing hand, clamping it against the bottom of the pistol grip for more retention. (You keep the mag at hand for reasons that will be clear when we discuss Functional manipulations.) Cycle the slide three times. Three is the magic number, for anything except loading. Sometimes once won’t get it done, and again you’ll see these same actions for malfunctions.

Unloading ends by checking the chamber. Visually check it. You cycled the slide three times, but if your extractor is having a problem there could still be a round in the chamber.

Verifying the status of the pistol – is it loaded or unloaded – starts with the mag and ends by checking the chamber. To confirm the pistol is unloaded stick your fingers of the support hand into the magwell. This gives you a physical confirmation that regardless of what type pistol it is there’s no mag in it. Cycle the slide three times. You end by visually checking the chamber for clear.

To confirm the weapon is loaded remove the magazine. Make sure it’s loaded, then insert and seat it in the pistol. Check the chamber to confirm it’s loaded.

Knowing how to manipulate your pistol starts with learning how to load and unload. The key is consistency, manipulating the weapon the same way every time regardless of the circumstances. This ensures safety and efficiency. At the same time you’re developing one set of skills that will apply to all your manipulations, which we’ll be discussing next. In the meantime practice the loading and unloading skills. You’ll be surprised at how much you can learn by spending quality time with your firearm.

Tiger McKee is director of Shootrite Firearms Academy, located in northern Alabama. He is the author of "The Book of Two Guns" – http://shootrite.org/book/book.html writes for several firearms/tactical publications, and is featured on GunTalk’s DVD, "Fighting With The 1911 – http://shootrite.org/dvd/dvd.html McKee’s new book, AR-15 Skills and Drills, is available off Shootrite’s website: http://shootrite.org/AR15SkillsBook/AR15SkillsBook.html

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Shootrite-Firearms-Academy/156608611038230?ref=ts

 

 

Remember Shooting should be safe and fun….MRPC

 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC      NEWS

MRPC NEWS

MRPC FULLBORE RIFLE

We will shoot at 300yds on the Camp White Range

this Wednesday at 4 PM.

 

If the 300 yard line is to muddy, we’ll move back to 600 yds.

With the warm weather we are having it should be OK.

 

MRPC   MRPC   MRPC   MRPC

 

Range Damage at MRPC

We are getting more and more bullet holes in the wooden “Eyebrow”

along the top of the bullet trap. 

This thin black wooden panel is there for your safety.

 

Shooters should always be near enough to their target to hit the target,

and

Should have enough control over their gun to not spray bullets around the range.

 

Please Stop Shooting the “EyeBrow

 

 

MRPC   MRPC   MRPC   MRPC

 

 

 

STEEL CHALLENGE

This Sunday April 9th

Starts at 9am    Come Early to Sign In

 

Fast and Furious     Lots of Fun

Great for Beginners

 

MRPC   MRPC   MRPC   MRPC

 

 

Jefferson State Shooting Association

<jssamultigun@gmail.com>

April 23rd Klamath 3-Gun Match

 

Hello everybody!

I have a match update and round counts for the next match.

 

It will be a 3 stage match, all 3 guns may be used on each stage. It will be two big stages ran separately and the third stage will be the two stages combined. Please bring a sling for your rifle, we will have duct tape and para cord if you forget!(I will have an extra sling or two if you don’t)


They are going to be an open format.  The rules are from the NW multigun
https://websitetonight.godaddy.com/projects2/5/4/9/1/2171945/uploads/NWMG_RULES_ver_7-9-14.pdf

Paper targets – Rifle or Pistol
Steel targets –  Pistol or Shotgun.

We will have some designated Steel Rifle targets out to around 350 yards,

the longest range targets will be a bonus, the furthest required rifle targets will be around 200,

so even the iron sight/red dot guys will have success.

 

Stage 1 – Paper targets –       14

Steel targets-           14

Rifle Steel Targets – 11

Stage 2 – Paper Targets  –      8

Steel Targets –       31

Stage 3 – Paper Targets –      22

Steel Targets –        39

Rifle Steel Targets- 11

 

Total Target Counts

Rifle Steel Targets – 22

Paper Targets       – 44

Steel Targets        – 84

It will be a ton of shooting and should still be a pretty fast day.

I think with everything considered it should be done with

around 100-150 rounds of pistol,

50 rounds of shotgun, and

60 rounds of rifle.

 

I will have stage printouts and setup/match time the next email in about a week.

If you have any questions just ask. If you are not sure about not having enough gear, I always bring extra to share.

Josh

P.S.  The last mixed steel match had a set of Howard Leight impact sport electronic ear muffs

and a set of black lightweight gloves be reported as missing.

please check and see if either accidentally made it home with your gear please.

 

MRPC   MRPC   MRPC   MRPC

Once-Booming Gun Industry Now Recalibrating

Fears over government limits on guns led to a 362 percent jump in the number of U.S. companies licensed to make firearms.

Author: Lisa Marie Pane

WEBSTER, Texas (AP) — President Donald Trump promised to revive manufacturing in the United States, but there’s one once-burgeoning sector poised to shrink under his watch: the gun industry.

Fears of government limits on guns — some real, some perceived — led to a surge in demand during President Barack Obama’s tenure and manufacturers leapt to keep up. Over the decade ending in 2015, the number of U.S. companies licensed to make firearms jumped a whopping 362 percent.

But sales are down and the bubble appears to be bursting with a staunch advocate for gun rights in the White House and Republicans ruling Congress.

"The trends really almost since Election Day or election night have been that gun sales have slacked off," said Robert Spitzer, political science department chairman at State University of New York at Cortland. "When you take away Barack Obama and you give the Republicans control of both houses of Congress, which is extremely friendly to the gun lobby, then the political pressure subsides. And that surely is at least a key part of the explanation for the drop-off in sales."

The pendulum swing is not lost on employees of outfits such as Battle Rifle Co., a small enterprise tucked into a nondescript strip mall outside Houston, with a storefront section featuring cases filled with handguns and walls lined with assault rifle-style long guns. The manufacturing floor and its eight employees, all veterans of the military or law enforcement, occupy the back.

"President Obama was the best gun salesman the world has ever seen," said production manager Karl Sorken, an Army veteran and self-described liberal who voted for Obama and notes the change for the industry under Trump is a topic of conversation in the shop.

"You might have people who were more inclined to buy because they were worried they might not be able to later. That’s going away for sure," he said. "But by the same token, the shooting sports in this country are going to explode because they’re not going to be as worried or restricted about how they can shoot, where they can shoot."

There are nearly 10,500 gunmakers in the country, many of them founded since 2000, said Larry Keane, senior vice president and general counsel for the National Shooting Sports Foundation. Experts say many are drawn to long guns, in part because sales for them rose after a Clinton-era ban on "assault weapons" expired in 2004 and politicians’ threats to restrict them drove demand.

At the same time, shooting sports grew in popularity, and returning veterans sought out weapons with which they became comfortable in Iraq and Afghanistan.

From 2004 to 2013, sales of all handguns — pistols and revolvers — increased nearly fivefold, according to industry figures. Sales of rifles tripled in that timeframe.

Battle Rifle took shape in the middle of that surge, formed in 2010 after its founder Chris Kurzadkowski ventured into his garage to build his police officer son a rifle from scratch.

Now, the retail store in the front of his shop has a cozy seating area, a TV and coffee with such names as AK-47 Espresso Blend. The craftsmanship happens out back, where the all-male crew brings a love of long guns, the Second Amendment, precision and a bit of artistry to creating custom-made rifles.

Battle sells about seven each week. Prices range from around $700 to as much as $4,000, depending on accessories, specifications and custom paint jobs. Some 60 percent of its weapons are sold to police officers.

Country music and conservative talk radio waft through the cavernous shop where guns are made and used ones repaired. The ribbing among the tight-knit group is constant, but when it turns serious, the men describe their work as something that transcends simple labor.

"Our forefathers realized what tyranny does and if you don’t have a way to protect yourself from tyranny then you become a subject," said ammunition expert Jamey Spears, who spent five years in Texas law enforcement until he was shot during a raid on a Dallas crack house.

The .45-caliber hollow point bullet that went through a gap in his body armor remains lodged next to his spine, a noticeable lump reminding him of how close he came to dying that day. "I have nothing but the most heartfelt adoration for people who serve so others can be safe," he said.

One reason for the surge in manufacturers of AR-platform firearms — called "modern sporting rifles" by the industry — is that they are not protected by patents or trademarks. That makes it an open field for anyone with the proper federal license.

Another has been demand helped by a monied clientele. The majority of AR owners are overwhelmingly male, with half between the ages of 45 and 64, and more than half reporting annual income of more than $75,000, according to a 2013 survey conducted for the National Shooting Sports Foundation, which represents gunmakers.

Daniel Defense, a company based in Black Creek, Georgia, about 25 miles west of Savannah, capitalized on that growth. It began in 2000 by making parts for AR-style firearms. Last year, Daniel sold 60,000 complete weapons.

Founder Marty Daniel, who employs about 310 workers and is more than doubling his manufacturing facility’s square footage, said he was prepared for the dips in sales and anticipates those will last through the year. But he considers the downturn part of a natural business cycle, like those that hit the housing market.

"There are some blips in there from time to time. And we’re in one of those because Trump was elected," Daniel said. But, he says, "it’s not gloom and doom."

At Battle Rifle, Sorken said he’s confident the industry will stay on the upswing, even if not at the rate seen in recent years.

"In this country, the gun culture is so strong I’m not worried about it going anywhere," Sorken said.

 

MRPC   MRPC   MRPC   MRPC

Hunka Hunka Burnin’ Iron—Elvis Presley’s Revolvers Up For Auction

by Guy Sagi – Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Hunka Hunka Burnin’ Iron—Elvis Presley's Revolvers Up For Auction

 

https://assets.americanrifleman.org/media/2779763/elvis_badge.jpg?width=182&height=209Rock Island Auction Company’s (RIAC) May 5 to 7 event will feature two of The King’s (that’s Elvis, for youngsters) pimped out (that’s decorated, for us oldsters) revolvers. Bidders will also have a chance to take home several items personally owned by the legendary performer, such as a diamond-and-ruby Shelby County sheriff’s badge that to this day isn’t recognized as a carry permit, the Elvis-signed contract to purchase Graceland and numerous files with his signature.                            

The King personally purchased the revolvers in 1970 from a Beverly Hills sporting goods store—yes, there was one in town back in the day, right next to the T-Rex dinosaurwash. Afterward, Elvis sent them to Germany for elaborate enhancement and one was even presented to Vice President Spiro Agnew as a gift. It was later returned, but not for lack of performance. Apparently, his staff thought it a good idea to get rid of it while Suspicious Minds were investigating alleged corruption.

https://assets.americanrifleman.org/media/2779764/elvis_revolver1.jpg?width=497&height=247

“We are thrilled to offer the memorabilia of an American rock and roll icon,” said RIAC President Kevin Hogan. “These revolvers are beautiful enough on their own to bring a great price, but when you add the iron-clad Elvis provenance, things really get exciting. Authentic Elvis items can bring tremendous buzz and high totals at auction, so we’re anticipating a lot of action when these cross the block.” The pre-auction estimate for one revolver seen being held by Elvis in a period photograph is $160,000 to $275,000.

https://assets.americanrifleman.org/media/2779765/elvis_revolver2.jpg?width=439&height=305

I knew I was in trouble when the CPA doing my taxes was playing “In the Ghetto” today, so the handguns won’t be joining my Elvis whiskey decanter, action figure or velvet painting from Mexico. I’ve checked into Heartbreak Hotel. For those with the monetary means, though, visit the RIAC website for a chance to take home a “hunka hunka burnin’ iron.”

MRPC   MRPC   MRPC   MRPC

 

The El Presidente Drill

by Jim Wilson – Thursday, October 29, 2015

Although the “El Presidente” shooting drill was devised some years ago, it is still an excellent way for the defensive shooter to test his or her skills and, hopefully, document improvement in his training and practice. It requires three targets, 12 rounds of ammunition and a timing device.

Targets are place side by side, approximately one yard apart. Regardless of the type of targets used, they should have an 8” circle in the center to designate the vital zone. As a skill test, only hits inside this vital zone will count.

The shooter stands at 10 yards with his back to the targets. At the command, the shooter turns, draws, and shoots each target twice. He then executes a speed reload and shoots each target two more times to stop the clock. Pistol and extra ammunition should be carried in the manner that the shooter usually carries in public, including a covering garment if that is appropriate. When shooting a semi-automatic pistol, par for the drill is 10 seconds. When shooting a revolver, par for the drill is about 12 to 13 seconds.

This drill is occasionally used in competition and various systems are devised to award lesser points to hits outside the 8” circle. However, for various reasons that I will not get into in this article, this is not necessary for the defensive shooter using the El Presidente as a skill test.

You will notice that I have used the term “drill” instead of training or practice. This is because its greatest value is as a self-administered test, given periodically, to determine the shooter’s improvement in training and practice. Obviously, it tests the shooter’s ability to make a smooth quick draw and a fast, fumble-free reload. But it also tests the ability to manage recoil, transition to other targets, and to maintain a focus on the front sight. In addition, the shooter must have given thought to his footwork as he must spin and respond to the threat behind him. All of these skills are necessary in order to complete the drill successfully and quickly.

Ideally, the defensive shooter will spend time practicing the basics. Periodically, say every couple of months or so, he will put them all together in the form of the El Presidente to determine how much improvement he has made. Documenting the drill on video would be even more helpful in evaluating performance and isolating those areas that need special attention and improvement.

I don’t consider the El Presidente a training method for several reasons. To begin with, when faced by three armed attackers, the defensive shooter’s first consideration should be to create distance and get behind cover. To stand out in the open and elect to take on three armed threats is just a good way to get shot. When one examines where he lives, works and plays, he will find that there is all sorts of cover available that will stop bullets. Regular practice sessions should include a move to cover so that it becomes a regular part of the combat mind set.

The second issue that I have with the El Presidente when used as a practice method is the delivery of two shots to each target before transitioning to the next one. In my opinion, when faced with three or more attackers, it makes far more sense to get one bullet in each attacker as quickly as possible. One can then go back and deliver additional bullets to a particular threat if that appears to be necessary. Obviously, we are only dealing in seconds here, but it is important to remember that a lot of rounds can be sent downrange in only a few seconds. One should always keep in mind that rounds may, and probably will, be incoming during those few seconds, too.

In years past, gamesmen devised ways to award points to hits that were in the silhouette, but outside the vital zone circle. This allowed them to shoot faster and still possibly win the match. Thus, how fast they shot became almost as important as how well they shot. This is probably where the comment, “You can’t miss fast enough to win,” originated. From the beginning of his training and practice, the defensive shooter should be concerned with placing all of his shot into the vital zone of the threat. Speed will come with practice.

So the defensive shooter should be conscious of the difference between training, practice, and a performance drill. This is the main reason that the El Presidente should not be shot on a regular, routine basis, to the point that it becomes a habit. It is, however, an excellent drill to test certain skills and allow the shooter to note his improvement and identify areas that need further work.

 

MRPC   MRPC   MRPC   MRPC

 

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MRPC   Weekend News

MRPC Weekend News

<img width="664" height="865" id="Picture_x0020_1" src="http://mrpc.info/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/image001-3.png" alt="cid:image001.png@01D2A6D2.AFE180A0“>

BE SAFE AT THE MEDFORD RIFLE AND PISTOL CLUB

 

 

FROM JEFFERSON STATE SHOOTERS—Klamath Falls/ Keno

 

Charlie Halvorsen <huntchukar@gmail.com>

Subject: Steel Match

                                                Saturday April 1st

Hello Steel Challenge Shooters this Saturday match is 5 stages.They will be all Parma ID based stages, three rifle & two pistol. Set up at 8:00am sign up 9:00am match start 9:30am. Weather

should not be a factor. 

 

Charlie

BE SAFE AT THE MEDFORD RIFLE AND PISTOL CLUB

Ever since I was a child, I’ve always had a fear of someone hiding under my bed at night.
So I went to a shrink and told him:
“I’ve got problems. Every time I go to bed I think there’s somebody under it.

I’m scared. I think I’m going crazy.”
"Just put yourself in my hands for one year," said the shrink.
"Come talk to me three times a week and we should be able to get rid of those fears.”
“How much do you charge?”
“One hundred fifty dollars per visit,” replied the doctor.
“I’ll sleep on it,” I said.

Six months later the doctor met me on the street.

“Why didn’t you come to see me about those fears you were having?” he asked.
“Well, $150 a visit, three times a week for a year, is $23,400.00.

A bartender cured me for $10.00.

I was so happy to have saved all that money that I went and bought me a new pickup truck.”
“Is that so?” With a bit of an attitude he said, “And how, may I ask, did a bartender cure you?”
“He told me to cut the legs off the bed. Ain’t nobody under there now.”
It’s always better to get a second opinion.

 

BE SAFE AT THE MEDFORD RIFLE AND PISTOL CLUB

 

Klamath USPSA

<jspsuspsa@gmail.com>

Subject: Klamath USPSA,

    Sunday April 2nd 2017

Greeting Shooters!

Sunday our first match is upon us! We’ll be on the new ranges and have 5 fun stages (watch out for the water hazards!) planned for you. Please be careful if you are parking off the graveled areas as it’s still fairly soupy and the park does not have the capability to pull you out of the mud.

Registration is 0900-0920 (to give us time to create squads and set up the Nooks, please arrive and register before 0920), match starts at 0930. $20 match fee. Match setup is the day before after Charlie’s steel match and the morning of at 0800.

Please remember to sign-in and or pay the day-use fee at the kiosk as required.

Thanks and we hope to see you this weekend.    –Jake

BE SAFE AT THE MEDFORD RIFLE AND PISTOL CLUB

 

Around the Water Cooler:

    "Truck (Car)" Guns —NO!

When I’m asked about the kind of gun – value-priced, replaceable yet useful self-defense gun to keep in the personally owned vehicle — that’s my answer, NO !

The car is not a safe. It’s not a holster. You can’t secure anything in a car (or truck). If it’s 100% secured to the vehicle, you couldn’t get it out and there’s no such thing as 100%.

This iteration of my irritation with the old ‘car gun’ thing is a recent report, a link to which I saw in Stephen Wenger’s Defensive Use of Firearms email news digest. It is an account of the numbers of guns stolen from parked, unattended "unmarked" police cars in Florida. For those who insist on reading the news item – this is one I don’t mind publicizing – go to this link.

"Thieves stole five guns from Central Florida law enforcement officers in the last three months, records show," the story begins. The news site, Channel 9, had reported on four other cop "guns in vehicle" thefts just in this year – including a submachine gun and an AR15.

Any lock box (that’s hidden) is better than just leaving the gun loose in a locked vehicle. Photo from Snapsafe.

"Most were taken from unmarked patrol cars," the report said. In the interest of securing the barn after the horse has absconded, agencies are now "reviewing policies." A spokesman for Florida DLE said that his agency had six guns stolen from vehicles in the last five years.

Cars – and trucks – aren’t safes. And they’re not holsters. They’re not storage containers. And it’s not just cops – the story noted thefts of guns from non-law enforcement rides as well.

The aforementioned Stephen Wenger publicized the "Rule 5" initiative through his website and news digest – I’ve adopted it as I find it silly not to. Rule 5 – maintain control of your defensive gear, especially firearms – came from an Arizona CCW Committee member’s efforts, along with another attorney, in researching civil liability cases against non-sworn firearms owners. Successful lawsuits didn’t seem to be so much the result of wrongful shootings, but mostly involved unauthorized access of a firearm due to improper storage of the firearm.

In my own state, the "Supreme Court" had two cases it decided against gun owners whose guns had been locked up — it was determined they weren’t locked enough and that guns are "dangerous as dynamite."

Like it or not, Rule 5 is a "thing."

I realize that due to some really stupid laws and regulations there are places you just can’t take a gun – sometimes it’s just not practical, think about some medical appointments. Unless you want to be disarmed during travel to and from these very safe "gun free zones," you’re stuck with locking the gun up in the car.

It’s not every day, it’s not all the time and it’s not a habit to get into. If that’s your situation, you work in a "gun free zone" (they never really are) for example, you’re caught between a rock and a hard place. Coming out to find the window broken and the gun gone means, (1) you’re still not armed and (2) some thieving ne’er-do-well is now armed with your gun.

For those extremely rare situations, have a lock box in the car. Some are secured only with a length of cable, some you can bolt onto the vehicle (be careful drilling holes into a car . . .) Taking steps to go beyond just hiding the gun, locking the car and hoping for the best may help out when someone’s killed or crippled with your gun – and, frankly, it may not.

It’s hard enough to secure guns in a residence. In a vehicle, it’s tougher. Best advice: don’t do it. If you must, have a security container, do your best to keep it hidden, don’t be away from the vehicle for long and take the gun inside when you get home.

FROM  – – Rich Grassi —The Shooting Wire   GPA WIRESERVICES

BE SAFE AT THE MEDFORD RIFLE AND PISTOL CLUB

BE SAFE AT THE MEDFORD RIFLE AND PISTOL CLUB

The interviewer asks, “What’s the first thing you notice about me?”
The guy responds, “Why, you don’t have any ears.”
Interviewer: “Get out! Send in the next guy.”

Second guy walks in for his interview.
The interviewer asks, “What’s the first thing you notice about me?”
The guy responds, “Why, you don’t have any ears.”
Interviewer: “Get out! Send in the next guy.”

This guy on the way out says to the third guy

“Whatever you do, don’t say anything about his not having any ears

He’ll kick you right out.”

Third guy walks in for his interview.
The interviewer asks, “What’s the first thing you notice about me?”
The guy looks at the interviewer intently for a few seconds and responds,

“Why, you wear contact lenses don’t you.”

The interviewer says, “That’s impressive that you’re so observant.

How could you tell I wear contact lenses?”

Third guy “Because you don’t have any [beeep] ears to hang glasses on.”

 

 

BE SAFE AT THE MEDFORD RIFLE AND PISTOL CLUB

 

The Medford Rifle and Pistol Club is proud to offer a COMPREHENSIVE

OREGON Concealed Carry Weapons Course

 

COST: $25.00

(A typical savings of $50 over the regular $75 price at other places)

 

This class offers far more than the minimum training offered at other places

It is held at the MRPC Indoor Range

             Live-Fire Range Time included in the Class

 

On the Second Saturday of each Month.

Remember that using a firearm for self-defense can have serious consequences.

Making a wrong decision can thrust you into the criminal court system and/or result in a civil lawsuit.

This is why you want to take a comprehensive class that offers you the best training available.

 

More information available under the “Training” tab of the club’s website  www.mrpc.info

TO RESERVE YOUR PLACE IN A CCW CLASSES:

Directly E-mail Phil at PhilGrammatica@yahoo.com

BE SAFE AT THE MEDFORD RIFLE AND PISTOL CLUB

 

 

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MRPC MORE NEWS

Thursday Night Practical Pistol Group Practice

Held at the Competition and Reserve Ranges

of the Jackson County Sports Park

 

The Thursday night Practical Pistol Group Practice will be moving outside starting this week.

They will start at 5:30pm ……  weather permitting

This will continue until the return of “Standard” Time.

 

Upon arrival All shooters must:

·        Pay a range fee ($1),

·        Sign an Insurance Waiver,

·        Use Sight and Hearing Protection

·        Abide by all common and group Safety Rules

·        And comply with all RSO or Range Marshal commands

If no RSO or RM is present, shooters shall assign these responsibilities to a present shooter.

 

Luke and Danny Meyers have agreed to be the designated range fee and insurance waiver collectors .

However, Luke or Danny are not the Range Marshals

 

If You Don’t Pay, You Can’t Shoot—-that applies to every shooter !

 

—–For Your Information—–

·         Do not pay the $5 RVSSA range fee at the front gate.  By shooting at an

MRPC scheduled event/practice, you only pay a $1 range fee to MRPC.

·         All shooters must shoot with the group or some sub-group. 

·         No individual shooting—Do not shoot alone !

You must renew/sign your Insurance Waiver, each and every time

you go to an event or practice on these ranges

 

If you can, come early to help set up, and all shooters should help tear down targets before going home.

 

Please police the area.    Leave the area cleaner than you found it.   Put all trash in the trash barrels.

 

First person should unlock the gate and put up the RED SAFETY FLAG.  

Last person out should lock the gate and take down and put away the RED SAFETY FLAG.

 

This property is NOT part of MRPC.   We are quests.  

Treat the area and property better than your own.

We do not want to lose the use of these ranges!

 

 

 

THE MEDFORD RIFLE AND PISTOL CLUB

 

Lawsuit Against Glock Founder Dismissed

Gaston Glock and his associates set up a network of sham companies around the world to hide money from Helga Glock, his wife and business partner, the lawsuit said.

Author: Kate Brumback

 

ATLANTA (AP) — A federal judge in Atlanta has dismissed a lawsuit accusing the founder of the company that makes Glock pistols of conspiring to steal millions from his ex-wife.

More than 350 pages long, the suit initially filed by Helga Glock in October 2014 included salacious allegations and drew unflattering comparisons between Gaston Glock and Shakespeare’s King Lear.

 

It accused Gaston Glock, his associates and related companies of participating in a decades-long, worldwide racketeering scheme to take money from Helga Glock through improper royalty payments, laundering money through fraudulent billing companies, and sham lease and loan agreements.

U.S. District Judge Thomas Thrash wrote in an order last week that Helga Glock, an Austrian citizen and resident, didn’t suffer harm to her business or property in the U.S., meaning she can’t bring a racketeering claim here.

 

"We respectfully disagree with the trial court’s ruling," John Da Grosa Smith, an attorney for Helga Glock, wrote in an email Tuesday. He added that they intend to appeal to the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

 

Lawyers for Gaston Glock, who also lives in Austria, did not immediately respond to an email Tuesday seeking comment on the ruling. They have previously said in court filings that Helga Glock lacked standing to bring the complaint.

 

The lawsuit sought damages of approximately $500 million and asked a judge to remove Gaston Glock and others from their roles in the company, reorganize the companies owned by Glock and restore a larger ownership interest for Helga Glock.

 

Helga and Gaston Glock started a company in 1963 that eventually became a gun manufacturer called Glock Ges.m.b.H. in 1983, and two years later Gaston Glock established a U.S. subsidiary in Smyrna, just outside Atlanta, according to the lawsuit. That U.S. subsidiary quickly became a major economic driver for the company as its pistols became popular among law enforcement officers and civilians alike.

 

Gaston Glock and his associates set up a network of sham companies around the world to hide money from Helga Glock, his wife and business partner, and then demanded trust and used intimidation to avoid her questions, the lawsuit said.

 

He created foundations and convinced her and their children to contribute their assets and waive inheritance rights, ostensibly to benefit them and protect the family’s control of the company, the lawsuit said.

 

After the pair divorced in 2011, Gaston Glock removed his wife and three adult children as beneficiaries of the foundations and said they and their descendants could not have any further association with the company, the lawsuit said.

 

Glock’s actions toward his family "resemble the senseless and self-destructive rage of Shakespeare’s King Lear, when he foolishly mistreats a loyal but candid daughter, Cordelia, in favor of cunning and ruthless flatterers," the lawsuit said. "Perhaps neither pathology nor psychology can provide a satisfactory explanation for why an aging billionaire would spend his twilight years seeking to terrorize members of his own family."

 

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