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MRPC    NEWs  817

MRPC NEWs 817

 

Thursday night 8-3-17

Practical Pistol Practice at the Sports Park

is canceled

due to hot weather.

 

 

 

 

Klamath USPSA News

Greeting Shooters!

Our next match is this Sunday, 6 August. 5 stages, ~135 rounds. This is the last points match before our section match in September. Current points standings are attached.

This weekend is going to be a hot one so please be prepared. I’ll have water staged at the bays if you forget.


Registration is 0900-0920 (to give us time to create squads and set up the Nooks, please arrive and register before 0920), match starts at 0930. $20 match fee (juniors are $10). Match setup will be the day before the match, I’m planning on setting up during the Speed Steel match to try and beat the heat, and the morning of at 0800.

Please remember to sign-in and pay the day-use fee at the kiosk as required. I’ve been getting reports that some park members are still using last year’s member numbers so I’ll be asking for numbers if you are a or have been a member and will have membership applications on hand if you’d like to renew.

See you Sunday!   Thanks,    -Jake       More information at Klamath USPSA <jspsuspsa@gmail.com&gt;

 
 

The Medford Rifle and Pistol Club’s

OREGON Concealed Handgun

Course

 

COST: $25.00 for members

(A typical savings of $50 over the regular $75 price at other places)

 

This class offers far more than the minimum training by others.

It is held at the MRPC Indoor Range

Live-Fire Range Time included in the Class

On the Second Saturday of each Month.

Remember that using a firearm for self-defense can have serious consequences.

Making a wrong decision can thrust you into the criminal court system and/or result in a civil lawsuit.

This is why you want to take a comprehensive class that offers you the best training available.

 

More information available under the “Training” tab of the club’s website  www.mrpc.info

 

Arizona Concealed Weapons

Same day as CHW  Course an additional $25 for members

OR Check calendar for Wednesday night class

TO RESERVE YOUR PLACE IN ALL CLASSES:

Directly E-mail Phil at PhilGrammatica@yahoo.com 

Non MRPC members contact Phil for information. 

 

 

 

August Pistol News

 

STEEL CHALLENGE… 2ND SUNDAY EACH MONTH

August 13th

SET UP IS THE MORNING OF THE MATCH.

PLEASE COME EARLY AND HELP!

 

USPSA…… 3RD SUNDAY EACH MONTH

August 20th

WE WILL NEED MORE VOLUNTEERS FOR MATCH SET UP. SET UP IS

NORMALLY 9:00 A.M. SATURDAY MORNING BEFORE EACH MATCH

 

KENO AUGUST 6TH   OREGON SECTION POINTS MATCH

 

IDPA….. 4TH SATURDAY EACH MONTH

August 26th

SET-UP FRIDAY AFTERNOON BEFORE THE MATCH

CONTACT LEIF JOHNSON 541-890-1195

 

 

 

Oregon Hunters Association Rogue Valley Chapter

 

During last winter’s excessive snows, the pheasant pen at Denman Wildlife Area collapsed. 

The Rogue Valley Chapter of OHA is conducting a work party  to resurrect the pen in order for it

to be ready for the Youth Pheasant Hunt on September 16th and 17th and the fee hunt that follows. 

Please join us on August 5th at 8:00 a.m. at 1495 East Gregory Road if you would like to help. 

Beverages and lunch will be provided by the chapter. 

Raffle prizes will be given out to participants during the project,

and everyone involved will receive a free raffle ticket for our

Henry’s .22 Golden Boy rifle Raffle in December. 

If you plan to attend, please send a quick note to Zach Lycett at zll3024@yahoo.com.

 

Thank you for your help in "Protecting Oregon’s Wildlife, Habitat and Hunting Heritage.

 

 

 

Classics: Thompson Submachine Gun

by Martin K.A. Morgan – Monday, January 9, 2017

Classics: Thompson Submachine Gun

By January 1944, the Allied advance in Italy had come to a grinding halt. Four months earlier, landings in the south along the Ionian and Tyrrhenian Sea coasts, the Gulf of Taranto and the Gulf of Salerno had brought war to the lo stivale (“the boot”). But autumn’s grand aspirations for a swift victory over Axis forces in Italy quickly gave way to the realities of winter weather and the Gustav Line. When the drive north toward Rome bogged down in December 1943 along Highway 6 in the Liri Valley, Allied leaders came up with a plan to outflank the enemy. They would do this with a surprise, multi-divisional amphibious landing 30 miles south of Rome on beaches around the seaside towns of Nettuno and Anzio. Codenamed SHINGLE, it was hoped that this operation would open a corridor to “The Eternal City” that would force the Germans to withdraw to the north.

With U.S. MG John P. Lucas in command, the Operation SHINGLE assault force of 36,000 men stormed ashore on Saturday, Jan. 22, 1944 against initially light opposition. Early gains were encouraging: U.S. Army Rangers captured Anzio’s port, U.S. Army paratroopers captured Nettuno, the U.S. 3rd Infantry Division penetrated 3 miles into the interior and the British 1st Infantry Division penetrated 2 miles. While this was encouraging, a lack of aggressive action on the part of MG Lucas opened up an opportunity for the Germans to counterattack the beachhead—and counterattack they did. By the third day, 40,000 German troops had the SHINGLE landing force surrounded. Vicious and powerful counterattacks fell upon the perimeter around Nettuno and Anzio during the weeks that followed.

https://assets.shootingillustrated.com/media/1541081/thomp1.jpg

(l.) Called by many names, “Tommy Gun” one of them, the Thompson brought suppressive firepower in a longarm compatible with fodder for G.I. pistols. (ctr.) Identifying this Thompson as a Lend-Lease firearm is simple thanks to the relocated sling swivels on the handguard and top of the buttstock. (r.) U.S. Sailor Frank Grismer recovered Auto-Ordnance Thompson serial number S-169807 at the battle of Anzio, Italy, paving the way for its return to the U.S. and donation to the NRA’s National Firearm Museum.


At one point during those days of intense combat, a U.S. Navy officer named Frank Grismer recovered a remarkable artifact from the beachhead—an M1928A1 Thompson submachine gun. With a horizontal foregrip, a Lyman adjustable rear sight, heat-dissipating cooling fins and a Cutts compensator on the barrel, the “Tommy Gun” that Grismer found near Anzio looked much like the ones being issued to the U.S. military, with one notable difference: the placement of the sling swivels. One swivel was mounted to the top of the buttstock (opposite the usual position), and the other was mounted to the left side of the foregrip. This placement identified the gun as being a Lend-Lease Thompson sent to the U.K. to arm Commonwealth forces, and thus marked it as being part of a unique chapter in World War II small arms.

In the years after World War I, John Taliaferro Thompson’s Auto-Ordnance Company designed and developed the .45-caliber submachine gun that would ultimately arm so many of the men who fought World War II. The “Tommy Gun” was first obtained by the U.S. Marine Corps in 1926, then by the U.S. Navy in 1928, and the U.S. Army finally standardized it in September 1938. But, the 15,000 rifles that had been produced by Colt for Auto-Ordnance in the early 1920s were just about gone by the late 1930s, so the weapon went back into production in February 1941. Initially only Auto-Ordnance was producing the weapon, but eventually the Savage Arms Corporation of Utica, NY, was subcontracted in an effort to keep up with government orders. Savage production of the M1928A1 obviously made a significant difference because, by February 1942, more than 500,000 had been made. The bulk of the M1928A1 Thompsons produced in 1941 and 1942 were Lend-Lease guns meant for the U.K. and they are uniquely recognizable by the spelling of the word “CALIBRE” on their receivers.

https://assets.shootingillustrated.com/media/1541082/thomp2.jpg

British soldiers with American firearms? As a product of the Lend-Lease program, the Thompson sub- machine gun wound up arming our allies, too.


The Lend-Lease M1928A1 Thompson that Grismer recovered from the battlefield at Anzio in 1944 was made by Savage and carries serial number #S-169807. Before it left Italy, it armed an unknown British soldier during the closing moments of his life because, when his body was recovered, he was still clutching #S-169807, and 19 dead Germans littered the ground in front of him. He was just one of the more than 7,000 men killed inside the Anzio beachhead during the winter of 1944. In the end, Operation SHINGLE did not succeed in outflanking the Gustav Line and opening up the road to Rome, and one month to the day after it all began, MG Lucas was replaced.

The incident stands as yet another example of the astonishing cost of the Second World War. The month of January brings the anniversary of Operation SHINGLE and, therefore, the anniversary of the loss of a brave young British soldier who fought to the bitter end with his American-made Savage M1928A1 Thompson submachine gun.

 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC     SAFETY/ HEALTH TIP FOR HOT WEATHER

MRPC SAFETY/ HEALTH TIP FOR HOT WEATHER

With the next few days being very hot

 

Please stay out of the Heat if you can.

 

If you come across a person showing sign of either

Heat Exhaustion or Heat Stroke

the following may help you.

 

Call for help via phone 911 or radio immediately.

PS. know where you are located before you call!!

 

The best way to prevent both is to STAY OUT OF THE HEAT…

 

If your patient with Heat Exhaustion becomes nonresponsive

Immediately treat for Heat Stroke.

 

 

<img width="726" height="861" id="Picture_x0020_1" src="http://mrpc.info/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/image001.jpg" alt="Description: cid:image001.jpg@01D30AE1.A2996E80“>

 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC A “cooler” place

Dear Fellow Members:

 

As many of you know when the Valley temperature reaches 95o and above,

our indoor range also gets very warm & hot inside.   I am pleased to inform you that the

club has been able to rent, at an affordable price, a large Evaporative Air Cooler for

the Indoor Range.   This is a test to determine whether we may want to incorporate

such a unit into the design of our new ventilation system improvements.

 

Since the range should always be ventilated while your shooting,  using other means

to cool the building are cost prohibitive both in equipment and operating costs.

 

This unit will be set on a timer to run from 10am to 10pm during this hot spell.  Please do

not move the unit.   There is a fan speed control on the upper right side of the unit, that

can be increased from 1 being the lowest speed to I believe 3 or 4 as the highest speeds.

The unit provides the most comfort if both of our outlet ventilation fans are on at the

same time.  As with all Evaporative Coolers, you will notice an increase in humidity during

its operation.  Use of the other fans will reduce this humidity while still

providing a cooling effect.  Please obey any signs posted near the unit.

 

Last week, July 17th , the Valley was in the mid to high 90o temperature range, and Monday

night Bullseye Practice was a very hot and sweaty activity.   Last night with the unit in

place, even with hotter >100o weather, the temperature inside the range was

warm, but not Hot like last week.

 

Please direct any questions about operation of this unit, to either:

                Scott Nolan—Club Secretary at vela1scott@gmail.com

                Or

                Don Chandler—at  thechandlers01@charter.net

 

Sincerely Yours
David McFadden
Club President

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC     NEWS   HOT WEATHER

MRPC NEWS HOT WEATHER

 

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

On-Line Newsletter

 

Fullbore Rifle Practice

and the

200 Yard Varmint Rifle Shoot

Have Both Been Cancelled this Week

Due to High Temperature Forecasts

 

 

 

CLUB HELPERS NEEDED

The Club needs Volunteers to Help In the Vacuuming of the Indoor Range

with the HEPA Vacuum

Contact Scott at vela1scott@gmail.com to help.

 

 

 

 

The Medford Rifle and Pistol Club’s

OREGON Concealed Carry

Weapons Course

 

COST: $25.00

(A typical savings of $50 over the regular $75 price at other places)

 

This class offers far more than the minimum training offered at other places

It is held at the MRPC Indoor Range

Live-Fire Range Time included in the Class

On the Second Saturday of each Month.

Remember that using a firearm for self-defense can have serious consequences.

Making a wrong decision can thrust you into the criminal court system and/or result in a civil lawsuit.

This is why you want to take a comprehensive class that offers you the best training available.

 

More information available under the “Training” tab of the club’s website  www.mrpc.info

TO RESERVE YOUR PLACE IN A CCW CLASSES:

Directly E-mail Phil at PhilGrammatica@yahoo.com

 

Also Available  

Arizona CCW Permit class.

 

The Arizona Non-Resident CCW Permit is currently recognized in 31 States,

including the States of Nevada and Utah.  (33 when coupled with the Oregon CHL)

 

The Arizona CCW class will be held twice a month in the MRPC Classroom.

The second Saturday of the month @ 1:30 – 4 p.m. and

The fourth Wednesday of the month @ 6 – 8 p.m.

Class sizes are limited to 16.  Pre-registration is required.

 

The Cost is only $30.00, which includes the required 2 sets of fingerprint cards. 

(Jackson County charges $49.50)

 

TO RESERVE YOUR PLACE IN A CCW CLASSES:

Directly E-mail Phil at PhilGrammatica@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MRPC OFFERS

FREE Training Classes

For Members and the General Public

MRPC offers several training classes that range from beginner level to advanced, as well as specialty classes like the Concealed Handgun Class for Oregon and related Arizona Concealed Weapon class. We also have a regular practice session for advanced pistol.

Once you are up to speed, you might consider joining one of our competition sports like IDAP, USPSA, Speed-Steel, etc. For more information on those and other competition/training groups, see the Club’s Shooting Disciplines web page.

Below are the current offerings listed in their natural progression. Feel free to contact the instructor for more information. E-mail Phil at PhilGrammatica@yahoo.com

Training Opportunities

1.     Intro to Basic Pistol Shooting

2.     Women’s Defensive Pistol

3.     Intro to Practical/Competitive Pistol

4.     Advanced Practical Pistol

 

 

Club Safety

Members should commit to

Safety at the Range.

 

“Train Safe” to “Stay Safe”

1.     Do not point your firearm at the concrete floor or walls,

2.     Do not point your firearm at the ceiling.

3.     Do not handle any objects on the shooting bench

while shooters are downrange.

4.     Stay behind the Shooting Benches when others are shooting

 

If holding a firearm at the low ready position,

the barrel of the firearm should still be pointed at the backstop. 

 

A negligent discharge into the concrete floor or concrete will walls

can cause the bullet to fragment and could seriously injure someone.

 

Do not point your firearm at the ceiling, it isn’t bullet-proof

 

Handling of objects on the shooting bench

while someone is down range or on the target side of the bench

is strictly prohibited.  Step back and relax.  There’s no hurry,

wait until they’re back and safely behind the bench

 

Remember these violations may result in injury &/or a loss of range privileges.

 

 

 

 

RUGER MARK IV RECALL

For Details Use the Link Below

https://ruger.com/dataProcess/markIVRecall/

 

 

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

This information is provided to our members solely as a service. 

The opinions expressed are not the official position of MRPC, its Board, Officers or Directors. 

Each member is encouraged to conduct their own study of these matters.

 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC     NEWS

MRPC NEWS

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

On-Line Newsletter

 

Fullbore Rifle Practice

 

We will shoot TODAY Wednesday 26th at 5 PM

on the Camp White Historic Rifle Range.

 

This will be a 200 yds tune up shoot for the varmint match on August 5.

We will shoot 22 rounds or less at varmint targets, prone or bench.

Hope to see you there. Frank 541 899 6872

 

 

 

CLUB HELPERS NEEDED

The Club needs more people who can take an hour or so to rotate every few Monday’s

 In the Vacuuming the Indoor Range with the HEPA Vacuum,

And

The “Goat-head” thorn is blossoming in the area behind the Indoor Range.

If someone could work them over with a hoe or shovel, it would be GREAT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RUGER MARK IV RECALL

For Details Use the Link Below

ruger.com/dataProcess/markIVRecall/

 

 

 

Multi-Gun Match

July 29 @ 7:30 am – 3:00 pm

For further information, Contact

MULTI-GUN DIRECTOR Tom Cail mrpcmultigun@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

The Medford Rifle and Pistol Club’s

OREGON Concealed Carry

Weapons Course

 

COST: $25.00

(A typical savings of $50 over the regular $75 price at other places)

 

This class offers far more than the minimum training offered at other places

It is held at the MRPC Indoor Range

Live-Fire Range Time included in the Class

On the Second Saturday of each Month.

Remember that using a firearm for self-defense can have serious consequences.

Making a wrong decision can thrust you into the criminal court system and/or result in a civil lawsuit.

This is why you want to take a comprehensive class that offers you the best training available.

 

More information available under the “Training” tab of the club’s website  www.mrpc.info

TO RESERVE YOUR PLACE IN A CCW CLASSES:

Directly E-mail Phil at PhilGrammatica@yahoo.com

 

Also Available  

Arizona CCW Permit class.

 

The Arizona Non-Resident CCW Permit is currently recognized in 31 States,

including the States of Nevada and Utah.  (33 when coupled with the Oregon CHL)

 

The Arizona CCW class will be held twice a month in the MRPC Classroom.

The second Saturday of the month @ 1:30 – 4 p.m. and

The fourth Wednesday of the month @ 6 – 8 p.m.

Class sizes are limited to 16.  Pre-registration is required.

 

The Cost is only $30.00, which includes the required 2 sets of fingerprint cards. 

(Jackson County charges $49.50)

 

TO RESERVE YOUR PLACE IN A CCW CLASSES:

Directly E-mail Phil at PhilGrammatica@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MRPC OFFERS

FREE Training Classes

For Members and the General Public

MRPC offers several training classes that range from beginner level to advanced, as well as specialty classes like the Concealed Handgun Class for Oregon and related Arizona Concealed Weapon class. We also have a regular practice session for advanced pistol.

Once you are up to speed, you might consider joining one of our competition sports like IDAP, USPSA, Speed-Steel, etc. For more information on those and other competition/training groups, see the Club’s Shooting Disciplines web page.

Below are the current offerings listed in their natural progression. Feel free to contact the instructor for more information. E-mail Phil at PhilGrammatica@yahoo.com

Progressive Training Opportunities

1.     Intro to Basic Pistol Shooting

2.     Women’s Defensive Pistol

3.     Intro to Practical/Competitive Pistol

4.     Advanced Practical Pistol

 

 

Club Safety

Members should commit to

Safety at the Range.

 

“Train Safe” to “Stay Safe”

1.     Do not point your firearm at the concrete floor or walls,

2.     Do not point your firearm at the ceiling.

3.     Do not handle any objects on the shooting bench

while shooters are downrange.

4.     Stay behind the Shooting Benches when others are shooting

 

If holding a firearm at the low ready position,

the barrel of the firearm should still be pointed at the backstop. 

 

A negligent discharge into the concrete floor or concrete will walls

can cause the bullet to fragment and could seriously injure someone.

 

Do not point your firearm at the ceiling, it isn’t bullet-proof

 

Handling of objects on the shooting bench

while someone is down range or on the target side of the bench

is strictly prohibited.  Step back and relax.  There’s no hurry,

wait until they’re back and safely behind the bench

 

Remember these violations may result in injury &/or a loss of range privileges.

 

 

 

 

Jonathan Shue Wins

National Precision Pistol Competition

Jonathan Shue of Team Cabot Guns shocked the competitive shooting world earlier this month after winning first place overall at the NRA National Pistol Championships. Shue is a retired Marine who now competes as a civilian―and his victory made him the envy of National Matches competitors at Camp Perry, OH.

“We are all super excited about Jon’s incredible performance,” said Rob Bianchin, founder and CEO of Cabot Guns. “That said, I’m not surprised. Most folks have heard about Cabot Guns as the manufacturer of pistols made from meteorite … we have proven time and again that we make the most accurate 1911’s on the planet. A Cabot is the hands of a disciplined athlete like Jon is certainly a championship combination.”

To secure the National Champion title, Shue finished the tournament with a score of 2638 out of a possible 2700. This included 126 X’s and a full two points ahead of the runner up, U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit Service Pistol Team’s SFC Adam Sokolowski. Shue was able to overcome some of the best military and industry pistol shooters in the world.

2017 NRA National Pistol Champion Jonathan Shue

“There’s a new Sheriff in town at Camp Perry … and he has a beard,” Bianchin mentioned jokingly about Shue’s extremely noticeable beard. In addition to winning the overall aggregate, Shue also brought home the Cabot Guns/NRA National Center Fire Championship as well as High Civilian.


Award-winning actor and 1911 enthusiast Joe Mantegna said, “Congratulations to Cabot Guns, Team Cabot and Jon Shue for an exceptional tournament at the National Matches. Once again Cabot has proved itself to be one of the most innovative gun manufacturers in the world. I’m proud to be a Cabot owner.”

Team Cabot had a good run this year at Camp Perry. Out of 56 teams, Team Cabot was the highest scoring industry team. They placed third overall and second in the A.T. Wall Metalform/NRA .45 Caliber Championship. In addition to Shue, the team members are William Bethards (captain), Grayson Palmer and Lee Fleming.

Precision pistol (bullseye) competition is the pinnacle of competitive pistol shooting because it is entirely based on accuracy instead of speed. Competitors attempt to hit a 1.7-inch bullseye target at distances of 25 and 50 yards, one-handed. Each competitor makes 270 shots over the duration of the match, where a bullseye (a shot scored within the 10-ring) counts for 10 points and shots that land in concentric larger circle receive less.

Since the company’s inception, Cabot has challenged engineers, machinists and master craftsmen to build the perfect precision handgun from scratch. The result: a superior collection of 1911 pistols made from only the finest of materials, technology and minds that the U.S. has to offer.

Read the full results of the 2017 NRA National Pistol Championships here: competitions.nra.org/championship-results/nra-national-outdoor-rifle-pistol-championships-results.aspx#1

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

This information is provided to our members solely as a service. 

The opinions expressed are not the official position of MRPC, its Board, Officers or Directors. 

Each member is encouraged to conduct their own study of these matters.

 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC NEWS July 18th

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

On-Line Newsletter

July Club Meeting

Wednesday  July 19th at 7pm at Indoor Range

All are welcome to attend

 

 

Fullbore Rifle

The group will shoot at 600 yards

At the Camp White Range

Thru the White Steel Gate off Kershaw Rd

at

5 PM this Wednesday July 19 ,

22 rounds or less prone or bench.

For Information call:  Frank 541 899 6872

 

 

IDPA Match

Saturday July 22nd

8am  Come Early

More Information Available At :  http://www.idpa.com/

 

 

Multi-Gun Match

July 29 @ 7:30 am – 3:00 pm

Contact

MULTI-GUN DIRECTOR Tom Cail mrpcmultigun@gmail.com

For More Information

 

 

NRA 22 Rimfire Precision Pistol Shooting

“Bullseye”

Every Monday night

Set up at 7pm, Shooting Starts at 7:30pm

22 pistol, 90 Rounds of Ammo, Hearing and Sight Protection

All Members Welcome

Target Cost $1

 

 

“Shooting Sports USA” on-line magazine

http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/nra/ssusa_201707/

 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC NEWS EXTRA

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

On-Line Newsletter Extra

 

MRPC    USPSA Match

“United States Pistol Shooting Association

 

This SUNDAY July 16th  9am

Sports Park Pistol Competition Ranges

Oregon Section Points Match

Please come help set-up on Saturday at 9am

 

 

 

Klamath Action Steel Match

There will be an action steel match this Saturday in Keno.

Registration is at 9:00 with shooting to start at 9:30

Please show up early to help with setup if you can….

 

Thanks                 Larry Watson    csicomp@gmail.com

 

 

 

MRPC Multi-Gun Match July 29th 2017

Shooters,

 

We are having the last local match of the year on July 29th. Please arrive at the range between 0700 and 0730. We will be having 3 stages, and shooting to a maximum of 235 yards. Registration is available on practiscore at:

 

 

Match fee: $30

 

An estimated round count (bring extra of course):

10 slugs

45 birdshot

80 rifle

120 pistol

 

It will likely be very hot. I know everyone gets hot, dirty, sweaty, and wants to bail out as soon as the last shot is fired. We ask that everyone stays through the complete tear-down of the stages, so that everyone can get out of the range as early as possible. Nobody likes to be the last one at the range putting away the final pieces of steel without good company of other shooters!

 

Tom and I send a special thanks to Dave Enloe, who has been very helpful in updating our electronic scoring Nooks. Scoring should go much easier this time around thanks to his help!

 

See you there,

Jake and Tom    mrpcmultigun@gmail.com

 

 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC    NEWS   7-11-17

MRPC NEWS 7-11-17

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

On-Line NewsletteR

Fullbore Rifle Practice

 

We will shoot on the Camp White Range

Wednesday (July 12) at 5PM from 600 yds.

22 rounds or less prone or bench. 

 

We have some decomposed granite to lay down on the 600 yds

shooting bench area, and could use some help spreading it out.

Come a little early on Wednesday to help, even if you don’t shoot.

Frank 541 899 6872

 

 

Range Cleaning Crew Needs Help

Do you have time on Monday Afternoons to help push around the HEPA Vacuum?

Please contact Steve Sampson, Club Vice-President if you have time to help.

Steve Sampson (sampson4wd@aol.com)

More Hands Make Light Work—Help Out!

 

 

LOST KEYS

3 keys on a talon key chain with skull were lost Sunday

at the Steel Match, Jackson County Sports Park range.

 

Help a shooter out!

Contact—-Alex Neuman at Guns R Us.

 

 

 

USPSA Match

This SUNDAY at 8am at the Sports Park Competition Ranges

 

WE WILL NEED MORE VOLUNTEERS FOR MATCH SET UP.

WHICH IS NORMALLY THE DAY BEFORE THE MATCH

@ 9:00 A.M. SATURDAY MORNING

If you can swing a hammer, or help carry some wood, you can help!

 

 

 

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Members continue Range Safety Violations at the Range.

 

1.     Do not point your firearm at the concrete floor or walls,

2.     Do not point your firearm at the ceiling.

3.     Do not handle any objects or reload on the shooting bench

          while shooters are downrange.

4.     Stay behind the Shooting Benches when others are shooting

 

·        If holding a firearm at the low ready position,

the barrel of the firearm should still be pointed at the backstop. 

·        A negligent/accidental discharge into the concrete floor or concrete

walls can cause the bullet to fragment and could seriously injure someone

·        Do not point your firearm at our ceiling, it isn’t bullet-proof and we have neighbors.

·        Handling of objects or reloading on the shooting bench while someone is down

          range or on the target side of the bench is strictly prohibited.

          Accidents happen when people of distracted

·        There’s no hurry, wait until they’re back and safely behind the bench

 

Remember these violations may result in injury &/or a loss of range privileges.

                       

                             “Train Safe” to “Stay Safe”

 

 

 

 

 

“FREE” Firearm Classes

OPEN TO MEMBERS AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC

 

·        INTRO TO BASIC PISTOL CLASS— TWO-HOUR

·        INTRO TO PRACTICAL/DEFENSIVE PISTOL CLASS

·        BASIC PISTOL CLINIC—-Hands on Range Time with an Instructor

·        ADVANCED PRACTICAL PISTOL PRACTICE

 

TO RESERVE YOUR PLACE IN A CLASS and more INFORMATION

CONTACT  Phil Grammatica

@  714-749-7216   or    mrpctrainingdirector@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged information and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or an agent of the intended recipient, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments.

MRPC   NEWs

MRPC NEWs

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

On-Line NewsletteR

FULLBORE RIFLE PRACTICE

We will shoot Wednesday July 5th at the Camp White Range at 5 PM at 600yds.

22 rounds prone or bench.  It is going to be hot but we will give it a try. Frank 541 899 6872

 

 

New Member Orientation

Wednesday July 5th–TONIGHT at 7pm

 

 

STEEL CHALLENGE

SUNDAY July 9th Starts at 9am

Come early to sign-up and help set-up

Reserve & Competition Ranges at

The Jackson County Sports Park

 

 

12 Issues With Extreme Long-Range Shooting

by G&A Staff   |  June 14th, 2017   |  Know the factors and their effect on shooting. 0

12IssuesExtremeLongRangeShooting_F

By Todd Hodnett – Photos by Mark Fingar

The definition of long-range shooting has been redefined over the last few years. We are now pushing further than ever, and not just launching bullets in hopes of seeing splash and making second shot corrections until we hit a target. We’re doing the math and accurately calculating for elevation at extreme ranges. Wind will be wind, so it will always be hard to ensure a perfect wind call at extreme long ranges, but that is what makes long-range shooting challenging.

Rangefinders are better and more affordable. Scopes can dial more accurately and with more vertical adjustment. Ballistic engines, like the Kestrel AB, give us incredible data. So when we talk long-range shooting, we are really talking about problem solving.

These are a few things we need to seriously consider. For these comparisons, we used a .300 Win. Mag. with 190-grain Sierra MatchKing (SMK) ammunition at sea level DA (density altitude).

ISSUE #1

RangeErrors20metersRANGE ERROR
Range errors can occur with most laser rangefinders, and they become a huge problem at extended range. Even with an error of only 20 meters, the difference in drop becomes significant.

THE SOLUTION
One of the best ways to avoid this error is to hit and then miss the target with the laser. If the numbers are the same, there is a good chance you are not hitting the target.
HitMiss

ISSUE #2

ParallaxPARALLAX
Parallax is a huge problem with most of the shooters I train due to their young eyes. By not getting all of the parallax adjusted out of a scope, something as small as .2 mils of parallax could result in a shot being 15.72 inches off.

THE SOLUTION
In addition to focusing the image and reticle onto the same plane by means of a parallax adjustment, another way to remove parallax is to center your eye in the scope. Do this by making sure you have a little scope shadow showing equally all the way around the ocular lens. I even teach students to set up their cheekweld this way. Thus, if you have any
parallax in the scope when you take the shot, you can be assured the reticle is on the target where you perceive it to be.

ISSUE #3

MV_ESMV / ES
Muzzle velocities (MV) and extreme spread (ES) are huge components of hit probability at long range. When shooting a .308 at a mile, I will ignore shots that strike outside the norm of the group the gun is shooting. Here’s why:
Whether you are reloading or have great store-bought ammo, you might expect standard deviation (SD) to be around 7 and ES to be around 20 feet per second (fps). But a lot of ammo may have 40 to 70 fps ES, which, as you can see in the chart, is a point of concern.

THE SOLUTION
Demand quality ammo when shooting long range. Whether it’s factory ammo or precision reloads, make sure the ammo produces consistent muzzle velocities in your rifle. If it doesn’t, use it for short-range applications instead of long range.

ISSUE #4

MV_and_TempsMV AND TEMPS
Muzzle velocity temperature sensitivity is when the velocity can swing wildly with variations in temperature. We have seen as much as 160 fps in a 100-degree swing. We have even seen more than 50 fps with a relatively minor swing of 20 degrees. This is not a linear adjustment, so shooters must know the temperature sensitivity of the powder being used.

THE SOLUTION
Getting data at sea level and 80 degrees can have a huge adjustment in elevation calculations when going to 8,000 feet DA in 30-degree weather. The ballistic engine will calculate for the DA portion. But one must have MV temperature tables running for the engine to calculate for the powder temperature sensitivity.
This is similar to ES when calculating hit probability, but it’s actually greater because all of the bullets will be off by this much instead of one out of five being a flyer.

ISSUE #5

Temp_Humidity_DATEMP / HUMIDITY / DA
In sniper manuals, it states that 20 degrees will give a point of impact (POI) shift of 1 minute of angle (MOA). This is true at 1,000 yards but nowhere else. When looking at DA, understand that temperature will give the largest difference in holds at distance. It takes 14 degrees to change your DA by 1,000 feet.
So let’s look at the difference in elevation holds at different distances with 1,000 feet of DA, which is equivalent to a 14-degree temperature change at altitude.

THE SOLUTION
Elevation is consistent, but temperature requires staying on top of changes throughout the day. Inside 500 meters it may not be a big deal, but it begins to be a problem at 1,000 meters and beyond.

ISSUE #6

WindDirectionWIND DIRECTION
Headwinds and tailwinds are of no real consequence at shorter ranges. However, as distances stretch, this variable can affect the time of flight (TOF) to the target, and TOF is everything. We took a 20 mph headwind and tailwind and compared the different actual holds using the Applied Ballistics (AB) engine, which calculates for this variable.

THE SOLUTION
Factor in the direction of wind whenever you shoot long range. Not doing so will result in substantial misses.

ISSUE #7

ClickErrorCLICK ERROR
Because many scopes don’t dial what you put in and some don’t repeat back to zero — dialing 20 mils may only give you 19.6 — you need to perform a calibrated test to measure the impact of each round. At 100 yards, a yardstick is 10 mils. So, if you are square to the target you
should show a 10-mil coverage on the target, and your bullet should move up that much when dialed 10 mils. Any error should be linear.
It could look something like this: At 500 meters, it may be off .1 mil, while at 1,000 meters it may equal .2 mils. Then .3 at 1,500 meters and .4 at 2,000 meters. These click errors quickly accumulate into inches.

THE SOLUTION:
Test your optic and make sure it tracks true. If not, those carefully launched bullets won’t land where they should.

ISSUE #8

SpinDriftAndDOFSPINDRIFT AND DOF
Spindrift is one of the easiest variables to account for, as the ballistic engines do a good job of giving accurate data for it. But let’s look at the same ranges and how much that is in mils and inches.
Direction of fire (DOF), however, is really talking about Coriolis effect. So let’s look at a shot without the correct DOF input. Let’s say we indicate we are shooting north but we are shooting east, which gives us about half the Coriolis effect.

THE SOLUTION
Make darn sure your ballistic engine knows all of the variables. Spindrift, while quite easy to account for, must be factored into the equation. Also, recognize the direction you are shooting. DOF makes a big difference.

ISSUE #9

DragModelsDRAG MODELS
All ballistic engines are not created equal. While standard drag models such as G1 or G7 work fine out to transonic range, they don’t predict what happens in the subsonic realm very well.

THE SOLUTION
Use custom curves that Bryan Litz and Applied Ballistics have tested extensively to determine what your bullet is really doing at range. These engines work extremely well.

ISSUE #10

AerodynamicJumpAERODYNAMIC JUMP
Aerodynamic jump (AJ), or the deflection of a bullet due to wind direction, can play a huge role when shooting out to distance. If one has not accounted for AJ while truing, this could easily incur an error of 30 fps in the MV. Even if the AJ was accounted for while truing, the effect on the bullet can destroy any chances of making shots at long range.
Let’s look at 12 mph, which is small but will account for a .15 mil deviation on target, and see what this means for long range.

THE SOLUTION
Understand what AJ is and how to account for it while shooting long range.

ISSUE #11

BadBCBAD BC
Unfortunately, bullet companies don’t always give you the proper BC one should use in a ballistic computer. Instead, they give the BC at the muzzle. This same error will not affect your ability if you true on any targets you engage out to transonic. However, it is not uncommon to see as much as 2 percent deviation from actual BC to what a company may represent as the stated BC.

THE SOLUTION
Instead of trusting listed BCs, run a drag scale factor (DSF) to morph the predictive and actual algorithms back in line in the subsonic regions. This will provide a much more accurate prediction of what the bullet will do at long range.

ISSUE #12

WindVelocity_CosineWIND VELOCITY / COSINE
Always the nemesis of the long gun, cosine (the way we assign value to wind speed if it’s not blowing perpendicular to the bullet’s path) is a huge problem that gets increasingly difficult with range. Not only is reading wind exponentially harder with range, now we have to get the cosine-determined wind value perfect as well. What I want to show you is math that only relates to a miss estimate of 1 mph. An error of 1 mph wind speed yields this much distance between our expected point of impact and our actual point of impact.

CONCLUSION:
At the end of the day, I am not trying to discourage anyone from extreme longrange shooting. However, I do want to show the challenges in making shots at truly long ranges. And again, I am not talking about shooting and doing corrections until you finally get a hit 50 rounds later. That is not true long range. That is having fun, and there’s nothing wrong with that.
There is a different set of skills that allows a shooter to be “on” at extreme ranges in only a shot or two. This is the sought-after skill in long-range shooting. Even though control or even being aware of all the variables may seem overwhelming, this is the challenge, and accurately calculating for each can be a rewarding feeling.

Read more: http://www.gunsandammo.com/tips-tactics/12-issues-with-extreme-long-range-shooting/#ixzz4kSVOmBSt

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MRPC    NEWS

MRPC NEWS

Medford Rifle and Pistol Club

ON-LINE NEWSLETTER

 

June General Club Meeting

This Wednesday, 6-21-17 @ 7pm

At the Club’s Indoor Range Meeting Room

 

 

 

 

FULLBORE  RIFLE  PRACTICE

Wednesday, 6-21-2017 @ 5pm

at

Camp White Historic Rifle Range

Off Kershaw Road @ Ja. Co. Sports Park

22 Rounds will be shot Slow Fire from 600 yards

Any Centerfire Rifle, Calibers up to 35 caliber

Prone and Bench Rest Shooting

 

 

 

 

IDPA MATCH

This Weekend  June 24th—8am

Reserve and Competition Ranges of

the Jackson County Sports Park

 

IDPA offers an exciting forum for practical shooters in which truly practical equipment,

techniques and courses of fire are mandated.

Prior to IDPA, there was no place to compete with common service pistols.

There were no shooting sports where your concealed carry holster could also be your match holster without handicap.

When you come to an IDPA match, you can not only use your duty/CCW equipment, you can be completely competitive with it!

Other shooting sports have become equipment “races”; IDPA will not.

If you’re interested in using truly practical pistols to solve challenging and exciting defensive shooting problems,

then IDPA is the sport for you.

Learn more about what makes IDPA great, from the practical skills training rules,

the variety of matches, the wide range of competitors and the ever growing community.

 

More Information Available At :  http://www.idpa.com/

 

 

 

 

This Month’s Steel Challenge Results

Fastest Shooter with Lowest Combined Time Wins

Each Stage is shot 5 times, and the slowest time for each Stage is thrown out.

A total of 5 Stages are shot, and the aggregate time is the Score.

Shooter only compete against other people shooting the same type of firearm. 

 

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PCCO=Pistol Cartridge Carbine Open,   RFRI=Rimfire Rifle, RFPO=Rimfire Pistol Open,   RFRP=Rimfire Rifle Open

RFPI=Rimfire Pistol Iron Sights?,   LTD=CenterFire Pistol Limited/Stock?,   REVI=Centerfire Revolver Iron Sights,

REVO=Centerfire Revolver Open,  (Open =Modified Firearm, Limited=Stock or UnModified Firearm)

 

 

 

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G&A Basics: The Science of Hearing Protection

by B. Gil Horman   |  August 22nd, 2013

 

It is estimated about one in 10 Americans has hearing loss that affects the ability to understand normal speech. The most common cause of this condition is excessive noise exposure. It just so happens shooting firearms is a popular activity that subjects its participants to noise levels intense enough to cause permanent hearing loss, unless the proper precautions are employed.

But how loud can a gun really be? It varies some depending on the firearm and ammunition used, but the sound is more intense than one might think. If we were to measure the report of a rifle, the sound would be checked for the following:

 

Frequency: from low to high sounds, measured in hertz.

Duration: how long the report lasts.

Intensity: how soft or loud a sound is, measured in decibels (dB).

It’s important to note when sound levels are represented in decibels, the increase in sound intensity is expressed in a logarithmic scale. The softest audible sound—near total silence—is represented as 0 dB. A sound 10 times more powerful is 10 dB. A sound 100 times more powerful than near total silence is 20 dB. A sound 1,000 times more powerful than near total silence is 30 dB. This means a change in volume from 150 dB to 140 dB is a more significant reduction in noise intensity than reducing 50 dB to 40 dB.

 

To clarify how loud a sound measured in decibels can be, it’s helpful to have some everyday sound comparisons to work with. Normal conversation occurs at 60 dB. Lawn mowers run at 90 dB, a jet engine at 140 dB, and the noise on a rocket pad during launch pushes the top end of the scale at 180 dB. So where does gunfire land in the lineup? When a gun goes off, the report slams into bare eardrums at 140 dB or more.

Some are incredulous at this revelation, saying there is no way a gun is as loud as a jet engine. However, they are confusing sound duration with sound intensity. The sound of a gunshot only lasts for a fraction of a second, but in that short time, it’s very loud.

How Much Can the Ear Take?
So what level of sound intensity is too loud for the human ear? Most experts agree you would have to be exposed to eight continuous hours of noise at 85 dB to cause permanent hearing loss, but sound spikes of 130 dB or more can cause permanent damage instantly.  This means every shot fired has the potential of damaging the ears of anyone within close hearing range. Again, there will be more incredulity at this information, since readers will say they’ve heard loud noises in the past and can still hear just fine. Here are two important things to remember:

The various tissues of the human body do not respond to duress in the same way

Permanent hearing damage can go unrecognized because it is cumulative in nature.

 

The human body contains an amazing variety of systems, each with specialized tissues to fulfill different tasks. Muscle tissue, for example, can become stronger after being strained. The first time you try a new physical activity—rock climbing, surfing or ballroom dancing, for example—muscles that have not been used quite that way before will become sore and tired. If the activity is continued over time, the muscles will adapt and become stronger. Eventually you will be able to continue those activities without becoming sore like you were the first time. In other words, our muscles adapt and become stronger.

However, the specialized tissues of the nervous system—including brain functions and hearing—do not respond to abuse by rebuilding themselves to become stronger. Instead, when they take enough abuse, they lose their functionality for the rest of a person’s life.

 

For example, think of all the professional boxers over the years who were amazing athletes in their prime, but were left with crippling brain damage by the end of their careers. They successfully toughened their muscles to Olympic-competition levels, but their brains slamming against the interior of their skulls with each blow taken to the head caused irreparable harm. It doesn’t usually happen in a single fight—although it can—but brain damage adds up over time. It’s exactly the same process with hearing loss. Each loud sound—whether in short or sustained bursts—is like a punch to the ear. It may not seem like a big deal at the moment, but it adds up over time.

 

Because hearing loss is painless and gradual, it can go unnoticed until the loss—or related symptoms—are quite severe. Many people think losing hearing is like turning down the volume on a television set; all the sounds get softer and softer until you hear nothing at all. That’s not the case, especially with noise exposure. What loud noises can do is punch holes in your hearing at certain spots along the frequency line. I know one sportsman who was shooting a particular gun almost every weekend for several seasons without hearing protection. When he did get his hearing checked, sure enough, along with some general hearing loss he had a gap (i.e., deafness) right at the sound frequency produced by his gun and ammunition combination. Ears do not get tougher with exposure to noise; they just stop working.

 

Besides hearing loss, there’s the symptom of tinnitus. From the Latin word for “ringing,” tinnitus is the perception of a sound when no external sound source is present. Don’t panic if you’ve had a little ringing in your ears at some point, that’s normal. However, if you are around noise loud enough to cause your ears to ring, it’s a good indicator that your hearing is in danger of damage. If enough damage is done, the ringing may not go away.

 

How to Protect Your Hearing
So how exactly should shooters go about keeping their ears safe? The obvious answer is to use hearing protection devices like sound muffling earplugs and earmuffs. These items should have a sound-reduction rating on the package shown in decibels (e.g., 21 dB, 30dB). The higher the number, the more noise they block.   But if guns make 140 dB of noise, how is a 30 dB plug going to help? First, the noise tends to travel forward of the muzzle, so the shooter’s ears are not always hit by as much noise as the gun produces. This does not mean the level of sound is safe—only reduced. Second, the purpose of hearing protection devices is not to eliminate sound, but to reduce the impact to a level that does not cause lasting damage. In short, a plethora of scientific studies  conducted over many years show hearing protection works, and it works at the sound-muffling levels common devices provide.

With hearing protection so high on the must-have list these days, most shooting ranges will have some form of hearing protection on hand for their customers. Hardware stores and gun stores also have a variety of options in stock. The cheapest form of hearing protection at pennies apiece are the disposable foam earplugs, which usually provide somewhere between 25-31 dB of hearing protection. Reusable rubber-type plugs are also available, ranging from $5-15, depending on the make and model.

 

The next step up from ear plugs are the ear-protecting muffs, which have the advantage of being reusable for years. The basic clamp-over-the-ear units can run from $10-40, providing the same 25-31 dB levels of hearing protection as the foam plugs. A popular option in really noisy areas like the indoor ranges is to use both plugs and muffs. This is a good idea, but understand the limitations of this system. A 30 dB plug and a 30 dB muff together do not provide a cumulative 60 dB of hearing protection. Instead, they each act as a separate barrier the sound must travel through successively. Hearing protection is improved, but not to as high a level as one might think.

Finally, there are electronically-enhanced hearing protection devices, including specialized hearing aid/earplug combinations, and earmuffs fitted with external microphones and internal speakers. The sound system in electronic muffs allows the user to hear surrounding sounds at a normal levels, or even louder than normal. When a dangerously loud sound is detected by the electronics, the speakers to the ears are deactivated until the noise reaches a safe level again. Prices for these systems range from as little as $50 to thousands of dollars, depending on what you’re looking for.

A Personal Matter
When I was approached by Guns & Ammo to write this piece, I hoped they wanted me on the job because of my witty prose and unquenchable enthusiasm for shooting. But in the end, they just wanted me for my body. You see, I have a moderate-to-severe bilateral hearing loss of over 60 dB in the 500 to 2,000 hertz range, along with symptoms of tinnitus. That means I wear hearing aids in both ears to help me understand what people have to say, and I have ringing in my ears.

My hearing loss is genetic in nature, which means there was nothing I could have done to avoid it. It’s a little gift from my DNA that kicked in about 17 years ago, but the symptoms are just the same as those caused by loud noise exposure. I was careful to protect my hearing before the loss, but I’m religious about taking care of what I have left now.

Is the Tinnitus annoying? Yes, on good days it’s only annoying. Do I miss hearing and understanding what my wife, kids and co-workers have to say? Only when they choose to speak to me. Don’t the cutting-edge digital hearing aids help? Yes, and they’re a real bargain at $1,400-3,000 apiece, plus the cost of replacement every three years or so, batteries, maintenance, service charges, and hearing checks.

 

While it may be better to have loved and lost than to never have loved at all, I just can’t come up with any reason why losing hearing would be plus. Ear protection is far too easy to obtain and use for anyone to have a good reason to gamble with their hearing. So what is your hearing worth? The last I checked, you can start protecting it for as little as 25 cents (foam plugs) per trip to the range. Take it from me, it’s well worth the investment.

 

 

 

 

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